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Forum Thread: Daily CYBERCLIPS November

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mogs Daily CYBERCLIPS November
Expert Contributor 1st Nov, 2011 20:25
Ranking: 2265
Posts: 6,266
User Since: 22nd Apr, 2009
System Score: 100%
Location: UK

Fourteenth Edition.
Thankyou for the support thro' the last month. Hope you find something of value/interest in the new thread. The new INDEX thread will follow shortly.
Please refrain from scoring on both threads.
Security remains the main theme of the thread with some related and varied topics.
Scroll down for the latest posts !!
Please note that no entry/post should be taken as a personal recommendation, unless otherwise stated.
Please continue to keep CYBERCLIPS free of junk and unattractive to any contentious individuals..
* Keep patching : up to date : be Cybersafe ! *

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mogs CClip 1
Expert Contributor 1st Nov, 2011 20:33
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Location: UK

British households download about 17 gigabytes of data on average every month over their home broadband connections, suggests a report.

Regulator Ofcom's study takes a high level look at the state of the UK's digital communications.

The monthly data diet is equivalent to streaming 11 movies or 12 hours of BBC programmes via iPlayer.

The report reveals which regions are rich in broadband, mobile and digital radio coverage and which lag behind.

As part of the research, Ofcom has produced maps which grade each county or conurbation on how well they support different technologies.

Read more at :-
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-15542558

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mogs CClip 2
Expert Contributor 1st Nov, 2011 20:37
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Researchers defeat CAPTCHA on popular websites
New tool is capable of solving CAPTCHA tests on Wikipedia, eBay, CNN and others

By Lucian Constantin
November 1, 2011 11:47 AM ETAdd a comment
IDG News Service - Researchers from Stanford University have developed an automated tool that is capable of deciphering text-based anti-spam tests used by many popular websites with a significant degree of accuracy.

Researchers Elie Bursztein, Matthieu Martin and John C. Mitchel presented the results of their year-and-a-half long CAPTCHA study at the recent ACM Conference On Computer and Communication Security in Chicago.

CAPTCHA stands for 'Completely Automated Public Turing test to tell Computers and Humans Apart' and consists of challenges that only humans are supposed to be capable of solving. Websites use such tests in order to block spam bots that automate tasks like account registration and comment posting.

More at :-
http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9221364/Res...

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mogs CClip 3
Expert Contributor 1st Nov, 2011 20:40
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Is Your Free AV a System Hog?

Antivirus software is a necessity these days but some solutions are a bigger drain on system resources than others. See how AVG, Microsoft, Avast and Comodo compare.

By Eric Geier | November 01,

The effectiveness of malware detection, how well it catches infections, is the chief characteristic to consider when choosing an antivirus program. But resource consumption, how much system resources it uses, is also important. This is especially true on older machines where heavy duty usage by your AV software can bog down the system and make it crawl when running scans.

In a previous article, A Guide to Free Antivirus Software, I reviewed four different free antivirus programs from Avast, Comodo, AVG, and Microsoft. I looked at the security features of each. Now, I am reviewing the resource consumption of the same four programs.

Read more at :-
http://www.esecurityplanet.com/malware/is-your-fre...

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mogs CClip 4
Expert Contributor 1st Nov, 2011 20:43
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Serendipity 1.6 Patches Security Flaw

The update addresses an XSS vulnerability.

October 31,
Version 1.6 of the open source Serendipity blogging software was recently released, addressing a cross-site scripting (XSS) vulnerability.

"All users are advised to backup their database before upgrading to the new version," The H Security reports.

"Further details about the release can be found in a post on the Serendipity blog," the article states. "Serendipity 1.6 is available to download from the project's site."

Go to "Serendipity 1.6 integrates jQuery and updates plug-ins" to read the details.

http://www.esecurityplanet.com/open-source-securit...

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mogs CClip 5
Expert Contributor 1st Nov, 2011 20:48
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Google search and Gmail users can block advertisers

Gives a little power to the people
By Lawrence Latif
Tue Nov 01 2011, 14:04
ADVERTISING BROKER Google will allow its search and Gmail users to block advertisers.
Google's existence depends on its ability to flog adverts but the firm claims it wanted to give its users more transparency on why certain advertisements are displayed. Google also mentioned that users will be able to block particular advertisers through its Ads Preferences Manager.
The company's success came from serving up personalised, targeted advertising to its users. The problem for Google is that web users are starting to realise that in order to provide personalised, relevant adverts the firm needs to know a great deal of information about the viewer. Google's image as a firm that takes data privacy seriously is vital to its successful operation.
Google is also rolling out "Why these ads" links on adverts to try to explain to users why a particular advert was displayed to them. We are pretty sure that "because our advertisers pay us megabucks to do so" won't be on the list of explanations provided by Google.
While Google's gift of being able to block advertisers might sound like a good way of giving power back to the user, in reality the firm is simply adding to the database of knowledge it has on the user. If it knows the user doesn't want to see adverts from a certain company, it won't waste its resources loading the advert in the first place.
Being fair to Google, its advertising is discreet and does enable users to access the majority of its services for the price of giving up some information about their online viewing habits. Now, users can tweak what adverts they choose to ignore on both web search and Gmail. µ

http://www.theinquirer.net/inquirer/news/2121637/g...

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mogs CClip 6
Expert Contributor 1st Nov, 2011 20:51
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Finally Windows 7 overtakes Windows XP use

Upstart takes out ten year incumbent
By Dave Neal
Tue Nov 01 2011, 12:46
REDMOND SOFTWARE firm Microsoft has finally seen use of its Windows 7 operating system (OS) overtake that of its ten year old brother, Windows XP.
Web analytics firm Statcounter revealed the change in usage and explained that globally Windows 7 has a 40.5 per cent market share, Windows XP has 38.5 per cent, and Windows Vista has 11.2 per cent.
"Vista was like the ugly sister that few wanted to dance with," said Aodhan Cullen, CEO, Statcounter, as he announced the changes.
"Despite Microsoft trying to keep it back in the kitchen, [Windows] XP has retained tremendous loyalty over the last decade. However, it looks like the younger Windows 7 is now emerging in the Cinderella role."

More at :-
http://www.theinquirer.net/inquirer/news/2121606/f...

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mogs CClip 7
Expert Contributor 1st Nov, 2011 20:55
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Hackers are selling stolen credit card details for as low as 70p online, a new government report has revealed.

According to the report released by GCHQ, the UK government's spy agency, cyber attacks against the UK have reached ‘disturbing' levels.

The report revealed that there were more than 150 illegal websites that allowed crooks to purchase credit card information belonging to between 20,000 and 100,000 people around the world at any given time.

Iain Lobham, the head of GCHQ, warned that hackers were targeting sensitive data, threatening the country's economic well being.


The security expert also revealed that the UK Foriegn Office and other key government departments had come under a significant cyber attack themselves recently, though thankfully, the attack was not successful.



Read more: http://www.itproportal.com/2011/11/01/100000-peopl...

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mogs CClip 8
Expert Contributor 1st Nov, 2011 22:18
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Last edited on 1st Nov, 2011 22:19
Critical Windows zero-day bug exploited by Duqu

Trojan used booby-trapped Word file to spread
By Dan Goodin in San Francisco •


The Duqu malware used to steal sensitive data from manufacturers of industrial systems exploits at least one previously unknown vulnerability in the kernel of Microsoft Windows, Hungarian researchers said.

The zero-day vulnerability was triggered by a booby-trapped Word document that was recently discovered by researchers from the Laboratory of Cryptography and System Security, or CrySyS. The security consultancy provided bare-bones facts on its homepage, and researchers from Symantec elaborated on them here. The word document was worded in a way to “definitively target the intended receiving organization,” Symantec researchers said.

Duqu generated intrigue almost immediately after its discovery was announced last week because, according to CrySyS and Symantec, its source code was directly derived from the Stuxnet worm used to sabotage Iran's nuclear program. Tuesday's update begins to answer some of the key gaps contained in the initial reports, including how the malware infected computer networks, whom it targeted, and exactly what it was programmed to do.

More at :-
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2011/11/01/duqu_explo...

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mogs CClip 9
Expert Contributor 2nd Nov, 2011 07:35
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Chrome Dev Channel Update
Tuesday, November 1, 2011 | 16:01
Labels: Dev updates
The Dev channel has been updated to 16.0.912.21 for Windows, Mac, Linux, and Chrome Frame. This release contains stability fixes. Full details about what changes are in this build are available in the SVN revision log. Interested in switching to the Beta or Stable channels? Find out how. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug.


Dharani Govindan
Google Chrome

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mogs CClip 10
Expert Contributor 2nd Nov, 2011 10:36
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Nitro' hackers use stock malware to steal chemical, defense secrets
Symantec traces one command-and-control server to China

By Gregg Keizer | Computerworld

Attackers used an off-the-shelf Trojan horse to sniff out secrets from nearly 50 companies, many of them in the chemical and defense industries, Symantec researchers said today.

The attack campaign -- which Symantec tagged as "Nitro" -- started no later than last July and continued until mid-September, targeting an unknown number of companies and infecting at least 48 firms with the "Poison Ivy" RAT (remote-access Trojan).

[ Find out how to block the viruses, worms, and other malware that threaten your business, with hands-on advice from InfoWorld's expert contributors in InfoWorld's "Malware Deep Dive" PDF guide. ]

Poison Ivy, which was created by a Chinese hacker, is widely available on the Internet, including from a dedicated website.

The malware has been implicated in numerous attacks, including the March campaign that hacked the network of RSA Security and swiped information about that company's SecurID authentication token technology.

In a paper published today (download PDF), Symantec researchers spelled out their analysis of the Nitro attacks and the use of Poison Ivy.

Read more at :-
http://www.infoworld.com/d/security/nitro-hackers-...

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mogs CClip 11
Expert Contributor 2nd Nov, 2011 10:40
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Study: User tools to limit ad tracking are clunky
Carnegie Mellon University researchers found "serious usability flaws" in several popular privacy tools

By Juan Carlos Perez

IDG News Service - People who want to limit the behavioral advertising and tracking they are subjected to on the Web aren't well served by some popular privacy tools, according to a Carnegie Mellon University study.

Researchers concluded that the tools evaluated in the study, which included IE and Firefox components, were generally too complicated and confusing, leading people to misuse them.

"We found serious usability flaws in all nine tools we examined," reads the 38-page report, released on Monday.

The nine tools fall into three main categories: tools that block access to advertising websites; tools that create cookies that indicate users want to opt out of behavioral advertising; and privacy tools built into web browsers.

The researchers enlisted 45 people to try out the tools. The participants weren't technical experts, nor were they knowledgeable about privacy tools, but did have an interest in this type of tools.

Read more at :-
http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9221379/Stu...

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mogs CClip 12
Expert Contributor 2nd Nov, 2011 10:50
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The New Gmail Is Here with a New Look, Streamlined Conversations, Better Search

Google is ready to unveil the redesigned Gmail. It's been working on it for months and the brand new design is finally ready to roll out. The changes go beyond skin deep, there's a revamped search box, a new conversation view and other improvements.

Google unveiled a preview of what the new Gmail could look like last summer, in order to get real-world feedback on some of the changes. Unfortunately, it doesn't seem that if you were using the preview theme you'll get the new look before everyone else.


In fact, the notification about the new design will start popping up over the next few days.

The design is completely changed, of course, that's the first thing you'll notice, but it's in tune with the rest of Google, there shouldn't be anything too surprising here.

More at :-
http://news.softpedia.com/news/The-New-Gmail-Is-He...

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mogs CClip 13
Expert Contributor 2nd Nov, 2011 10:58
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Malware writers and cyber criminals are increasingly moving into specialised fields of attack and exploitation, according to security firm IID.
The company said in its quarterly threat report that researchers have noted a trend towards specialisation in the malware space, with many criminals focusing on one specific area of expertise to trade on the black market.

IID chief executive Lars Harvey told V3 that malware writers are not only focusing on specific areas of attack, but are also commoditising exploited machines on a more granular level.
Rather than sell off large quantities of infected systems for botnet activity, Harvey said attackers have begun selling access to individual high-value targets such as systems with access to government or large-enterprise networks.
Additionally, the malware samples spotted in the wild are developing sophisticated, highly-specialised practices. Harvey noted infections such as Avalanche, which use a technique known called fast flux to rapidly cycle infected domains through multiple DNS addresses and avoid detection.
"They are experienced, they are focused and that makes it hard for the defenders," Harvey explained.
"They are specialists, and at best we are generalists."

Read more at :-
http://www.v3.co.uk/v3-uk/news/2121809/iid-malware...

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mogs CClip 14
Expert Contributor 2nd Nov, 2011 16:07
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Secunia offers to coordinate vulnerability disclosure on behalf of researchers
New vulnerability coordination program aims to reward security researchers and make their job easier

By Lucian Constantin | IDG News Service
Print|Add a comment

Danish vulnerability management company Secunia aims to make the task of reporting software vulnerabilities easier for security researchers by offering to coordinate disclosure with vendors on their behalf.

The Secunia Vulnerability Coordination Reward Programme (SVCRP) is the latest addition to a list of offerings like TippingPoint's Zero Day Initiative or Verisign's iDefense Labs Vulnerability Contributor Program, which allow researchers to avoid the hassle of dealing with different vendor bug reporting policies.

However, according to Carsten Eiram, Secunia's chief security specialist, SVCRP doesn't aim to be an alternative to these programs, but to complement them.

"Other major vulnerability coordination offerings exist but most have a business model wrapped around them," Eiram said.

"Most other schemes pay researchers for their discoveries, and, while these offerings are excellent for researchers, the companies are, naturally, very selective in which vulnerabilities they wish to purchase and coordinate," he said.

Secunia plans to fill the void left by other programs by accepting the vulnerabilities they reject, regardless of their classification and as long as they are in off-the-shelf products. Flaws discovered in online services such as Facebook, for example, do not qualify.

The company won't profit directly from SVCRP and doesn't plan to provide advance notification about the reported flaws to its customers, as other companies do. "All customers, as well as the community at large, will receive the information simultaneously when the Secunia advisory is published," the firm said.

Read more at :-
http://www.infoworld.com/d/security/secunia-offers...

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mogs CClip 15
Expert Contributor 2nd Nov, 2011 16:13
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PwnedList Tells You If Your Account Was Hacked

A website called pwnedlist.com provides internauts the answer to the age-old question “Was my account hacked?”. The recently inaugurated page compares usernames or email addresses to a collection of close to 5 million records that were leaked online by hackers.


“We wanted to create a simple one-click service to help the public verify if their accounts have been compromised as a part of a corporate data breach, a malicious piece of software sneaking around on their computers, or any other form of security compromise,” reads a presentation on the site.

The service was founded by Alen Puzic, a security researcher who works for TippingPoint DVLabs, a division of HP. In his noble quest he is aided by a colleague, Jasiel Spelman.

The site itself is very easy to use. All a user needs to do to learn if he was pwned or not is to enter the address or the ID of the account he suspects of being hacked and he will quickly be provided with an answer.

The main page is topped by a counter which reveals the number of emails and usernames discovered, the figures showing that at the time of this post 4,981,012 credentials were held.

Read more at :-
http://news.softpedia.com/news/PwnedList-Tells-You...

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mogs CClip 16
Expert Contributor 2nd Nov, 2011 16:16
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MPAA Prepares Attack on Rogue Cyberlockers
An internal Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA) fact sheet reveals the organization's plans to go after the so-called rogue cyberlockers which they believe to be extremely profitable for the ones that run them.

According to TorrentFreak, the two-page document entitled “It’s All About the Money: The ‘Business’ Model of Rogue Cyberlockers,” gives an overview on the matter of file-sharing services considered to be a menace to the industry.


“Rogue cyberlockers aren’t just distribution hubs for stolen movies and TV shows – both the users who upload content and the operators who run the sites can earn money from doing so. As Internet video traffic grows, the threat from rogue cyberlockers that profit from stolen content is rising rapidly,” the paper reads.

More at :-
http://news.softpedia.com/news/MPAA-Prepares-Attac...

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mogs CClip 17
Expert Contributor 2nd Nov, 2011 16:20
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Experts: Firms need to come clean about cyber attacks

Dutch counter-terrorism head says gov was last to know on DigiNotar hack
By Brid-Aine Parnell • Get more from this author

Posted in Security, 2nd November 2011 12:11 GMT

LCC Businesses need to ‘fess up when they’ve been the victims of cyber attacks, experts at the London Conference on Cyberspace (LCC) said today.

Government and biz bosses said that even though companies didn’t really want to own up to having been breached, they needed to start sharing information with officials to protect critical infrastructures.


Erik Akerboom, president of the Cyber Security Council in the Netherlands, said that his government needed to know about the DigiNotar hack when it happened, not later on.

Read more at :-
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2011/11/02/business_n...

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mogs CClip 18
Expert Contributor 2nd Nov, 2011 18:30
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Following on from CClip 15 ************
How to find out if your email address has been compromised

An enterprising group of security researchers has created a massive list of 'pwned' email addresses and user names. Take a minute to see if you're on it
By Woody Leonhard | InfoWorldFollow @infoworld



Ever had a sneaky suspicion that somebody, somewhere has cracked your email account?

A handful of researchers at well-known security firm HP/TippingPoint DVLabs spend their spare time looking for publicly posted lists of cracked email addresses. They've also written programs that comb repositories of dumped stolen data, including Pastebin. Their collection has grown to 5,000,000 known compromised accounts, and it's growing daily.

If you're curious to see if your email address or username has appeared on any of those clandestine lists, drop by PwnedList and see if your email address has appeared on any of the lists DVLabs has accumulated.

While the list is far from complete -- I verified that several known "pwned" email addresses aren't on the list -- it's sobering and well worth your time to check. It's free, and it only takes a second (if the server hasn't melted down).

More at :-
http://www.infoworld.com/t/hacking/how-find-out-if...

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mogs CClip 19
Expert Contributor 3rd Nov, 2011 19:46
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Chrome Beta Channel Update
Thursday, November 3, 2011 | 08:00
Labels: Beta updates
The Beta channel has been updated to 16.0.912.21 for Windows, Mac, Linux, and Chrome Frame.

For an overview of key features in this release check out the Google Chrome Blog. Interested in switching to the Beta or Stable channels? Find out how. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug.

Anthony Laforge
Google Chrome
5 comments | Links to this

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mogs CClip 20
Expert Contributor 3rd Nov, 2011 19:54
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Zeus (Still) Wants Your Wallet

The antivirus community has failed to figure out this able and persistent piece of malware. It's as simple as that.

By Robert McGarvey | November 02, 2011 Share

The Zeus Trojan, first identified in 2007 (almost prehistory in Internet time), may still be the most pernicious and costly malware out there. In fact, your machine may be infected right now and “You would probably not know it,” said Brian Krebs, a onetime Washington Post reporter who now ranks as perhaps the most influential independent security blogger in the business. “Antivirus software is not doing a good job of detecting and removing Zeus."

Two facts have made Zeus both persistent and pervasive.

Fact One: It is entirely about the money. Zeus is a key logger that wakes up only when a user of an infected machine visits a financial site. It keeps its activity to a minimum and that makes it hard to notice.

Fact Two: “Every version of Zeus is different,” said Krebs, and this is because this malware is effectively open source. Any bad guy can download it and customization kits are for sale to up its larceny. The upshot is that Zeus’ digital fingerprints keep changing; making it difficult for antivirus (AV) software to recognize it. It actually is “fairly easy to get rid of Zeus once it is detected,” said Kevin McNamee, security architect at network security firm Kindsight.

It is just terribly hard to identify it.

“Way over 20 million computers have been infected by Zeus,” said Lance James, an executive at security firm Vigilant and himself one of the first to detect Zeus. “It is the king of malware.”

More at :-
http://www.esecurityplanet.com/hackers/zeus-still-...

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mogs CClip 21
Expert Contributor 3rd Nov, 2011 20:02
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IID Reports Rise in Internet Malware, Phishing Group Avalanche Resurfaces

Written by
Ravi Mandalia


Website security services provider Internet Identity (IID) has released its quarterly security report in which it claims that internet malware is rising unchecked.

According to the Third Quarter eCrime Report released by the company, the number of malware infested websites has increased by 89 percent during the third quarter of 2011 from the second quarter of the same year.

In its research, the company found that FDIC, U.S. Federal Reserve, IRS and NACHA (National Automated Clearing House Association) are the most impersonated organisations on the web.

The company claimed that the rise in the number of malware may be attributed to the Avalanche phishing group resuming their nefarious activities. This is the same group that was responsible for around two-thirds of all the phishing attacks that took place in the second half of 2009.



Read more: http://www.itproportal.com/2011/11/02/iid-reports-...

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mogs CClip 22
Expert Contributor 3rd Nov, 2011 20:13
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Panda Report: 5 Million New Malware Samples in Q3

Panda Labs issued their third quarter report in which they highlight the increase of malware, the activity of the infamous Anonymous hacktivists and other interesting security related issues.

The paper shows that while they keep making headlines, Anonymous suffered a blow with 15 alleged members of the organization being apprehended in Italy. Their activity in the US is also outlined, the hacking of a US Department of Defense contractor and the leaking of NATO documents being the most significant attacks that took place since July.

Cybercrime in general also took a blow as some crooks responsible for million dollar operations were put behind bars. On the downside, events like the death of Amy Winehouse gave tricksters new ideas for social engineering plots.

The figures in the report reveal that the most new malware samples detected by the their researchers were actually Trojans (76%), followed by Viruses (12%) and Worms (6%). More specifically, Generic Trojans were identified as being the most common, the next positions being occupied by CI.A Trojans and Generic Malware.

The countries that suffered the most from malware infections turn out to be China, Taiwan, Turkey, Russia and Poland. The least affected were Switzerland, the UK and Sweden.

More at :-
http://news.softpedia.com/news/Panda-Report-5-Mill...

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mogs CClip 23
Expert Contributor 3rd Nov, 2011 20:26
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Download Google Chrome 16 with Multiple-Profile Support Finally! Google Chrome Beta has moved to version 16, bringing support for multiple profiles. And it only took them a few days to slide the feature from Dev into Beta.

What this means is that you can have all the personal stuff synchronized in any Google Chrome you use.

This is done by signing into the browser with your Google Account as a new user, and the sync service will automatically kick in and deliver your bookmarks, settings, apps, omnibox history and extensions.

Mind that multiple profiles feature aims at offering your own personalized Chrome environment and is by no means intended to keep your data safe.

Anyone accessing your profile will be able to check your history links, installed apps and extensions; so disconnecting your Google Account will not sign you out of an app or lock access to the browsing traces in your profile.



http://news.softpedia.com/news/Download-Google-Chr...


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mogs CClip 24
Expert Contributor 4th Nov, 2011 07:41
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Chrome Dev Channel Update
Thursday, November 3, 2011 | 16:31
Labels: Dev updates

The Dev channel has been updated to 17.0.928.0 for Windows, Mac, Linux, and Chrome Frame. This build contains the following updates:

All
Updated V8 - 3.6.6.3
Prompt the user if they want to cancel downloads occurring when the last Incognito Window of a profile is closed.
Panels are enabled by default (extensions-only, “Tasky” in Web Store is one example)
Adjustable margins supported in Print Preview.
Mouse Lock “Allow” permission (given via a prompt) is now saved in content settings per domain.
Linux
Fix the multi-profile selection bubble when using a chrome-theme [r107495]
Optimization work to make the GTK+ tabstrip do less redundant painting. Please report any regressions, especially with complex themes. [Issue: 100803]
Known Issues
NaCl will not run on Windows
Indexed Database: IDBDatabase.transaction() - passing [] as first argument is no longer supported per specification [Issue: 99690]
Indexed Database: Databases will fail to load previously created object stores [Issue: 102537].
Full details about what changes are in this build are available in the SVN revision log. Interested in switching release channels? Find out how. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug.

Dharani Govindan
Google Chrome

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Expert Contributor 4th Nov, 2011 07:46
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Microsoft releases temporary fix for critical Windows bug

Duqu vulnerability patched – for now
By Dan Goodin in San Francisco •
Microsoft has issued a temporary fix for a critical Windows vulnerability that has already been exploited to install highly sophisticated malware that targeted manufacturers of industrial systems.

In an advisory issued late Thursday, Microsoft said the previously unknown flaw in the Win32k TrueType font-parsing engine affected every supported version of Windows, including Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008, which are the most secure to date. The critical vulnerability was recently exploited to spread Duqu, malware that some researchers say was derived from last year's Stuxnet worm that sabotaged Iran's uranium enrichment program.

Read more at :-
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2011/11/04/duqu_vuln_...

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Expert Contributor 5th Nov, 2011 00:09
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Microsoft releases manual fix for Duqu zero-day
By Julie Bort

Network World - Microsoft has released a Fix-it tool to allow Windows users to manually patch their systems to thwart the Duqu Trojan: Microsoft Security Advisory (2639658).

Duqu, or "son of Stuxnet" as some call it, is worrisome because it installs a keystroke logger and then can replicate itself, even across secure networks, using the passwords obtained. It communicates with other servers across the Internet, giving hackers access. The malware will remove itself after 30 days.

In its Security Advisory, Microsoft confirmed that it is seeing attacks in the wild, but downplayed the impact. The Advisory said, "Microsoft is investigating a vulnerability in a Microsoft Windows component, the Win32k TrueType font parsing engine. An attacker who successfully exploited this vulnerability could run arbitrary code in kernel mode. The attacker could then install programs; view, change, or delete data; or create new accounts with full user rights. We are aware of targeted attacks that try to use the reported vulnerability; overall, we see low customer impact at this time. This vulnerability is related to the Duqu malware."

Nevertheless, Microsoft did release a "Fix-it" tool that allows IT professionals to manually disable the code with the hole in their systems. It does have some drawbacks in that, "Applications that rely on embedded font technology will fail to display properly," Microsoft warns. Additionally, IT professionals can also manually perform the fix by entering in a series of commands at an administrative prompt. The Fix-It is for all versions of Windows. Here is a link to it. The manual commands are available via Microsoft's Security Advisory, under "Workarounds."

Microsoft is still investigating if it will also release a patch. If so, this patch is not currently scheduled to be part of Tuesday's batch.

More at :-
http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9221516/Mic...

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Expert Contributor 5th Nov, 2011 00:17
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A short history of crimeware
Eight major advances in crimeware technology as malware authors strive to circumvent traditional defenses George Orwell, in his classic vision of the future "Nineteen Eighty-Four," foresaw a totalitarian state filled with devices termed telescreens that were the state's means of monitoring citizens. Today, with our dependence on modern technologies such as PCs and mobile devices, and the widespread availability of crimeware, we've exceeded anything Orwell could ever have imagined. Crimeware is a class of malware that is specifically designed to automate large-scale financial crime. We now carry our own version of Orwell's telescreens with U.S. -- termed mobile devices -- having cameras, microphones, GPS, and containing all our interactions. Instead of Orwell's vision of a totalitarian state monitoring citizens' lives, we now have a limitless number of individual criminals or hostile states from around the globe capable of using crimeware within our technologies to track our every movement, conversation and action.

With the widespread proliferation of crimeware, we virtually broadcast our very lives around the world for criminals, competitors, and enemies to do with what they will. There is no longer any notion of yesteryear's security, let alone the fatigued concepts of privacy or anonymity.

There are few viable options to combat crimeware's success in undermining today's technologies. One proposed approach fights fire with fire, using malware's own techniques in hand-to-hand combat for the ultimate control of processors. This anti-crimeware approach defeats crimeware by disabling its methods of harvesting data from within PCs, but makes no actual inroads into removing crimeware. Intel and McAfee recently proposed scrapping current processor technology and starting again to design new impenetrable processors [PDF link]. One can only imagine the time and cost necessary to replace and update our entire processor infrastructure. In either case, it is important to know how seriously crimeware has undermined our technologies and the radical thinking required to fight crimeware.

Read more at :-
http://www.infoworld.com/d/security/short-history-...

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Expert Contributor 5th Nov, 2011 00:22
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Customers complain of a widespread outage leaving their funds inaccessible at the start of a weekend.
By Tom Brewster, 4 Nov 2011 at 16:04

HSBC systems, including cashpoints and internet banking, appear to have gone down.

Customers from across the world have complained about being unable to withdraw money or use internet banking.

"Disappointed with #HSBC how can their system be dwn. Haven't been able to buy or take out any money for an hour," said Twitter user MissYummyMama.

"#hsbc bank down, cant log-in to internet banking, can't draw money out & can't use card," said mattwing79.

Our sister title Cloud Pro has been attempting to use both the HSBC phone and internet banking services but could not access either.

The HSBC website is up yet it appears to be impossible to login.

"I'm sorry this service is not available right now," an automated message on the phone service said.

HSBC confirmed it has heard of some issues and is investigating.

More at :-
http://www.itpro.co.uk/637180/hsbc-consumer-bankin...

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Expert Contributor 5th Nov, 2011 00:28
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Google Chrome 17 Is Here, in the Dev Channel, with Several Improvements Now that the Google Chrome 16 Beta is out, dev channel users are in for a treat as they've been upgraded to the brand new Google Chrome 17. Of course, the same dev channel users know that this is not much to cheer about, apart perhaps the fact that they'll finally start seeing new features come in, after the pre-beta release lull.

Google Chrome 17.0.928.0 for Windows, Mac and Linux has now been made available. Google Chrome Frame users have also received the same update.

There are several new things in the latest version, compared to the previous Google Chrome 16, the V8 JavaScript engine has been updated to V8 3.6.6.3, a rather symmetrical version number, also known as a palindrome, a word or number which can be read the same in both directions.

There is now a prompt asking users if they are sure they want to cancel downloads started during Incognito Mode, if the last such window is closed. The same happens for any downloads when closing Chrome completely.

http://news.softpedia.com/news/Google-Chrome-17-Is...

Panels are now finally enabled by default, but they can be used only by extensions. Panels are small windows which pop out to house small apps that need to be accessible all the time, but which don't really need their own tab, chat apps, music players and so on.

In fact, the new YouTube app for Google+ could live very well inside a Panel.

Print Preview, which was recently introduced, now supports adjustable margins. Mouse lock permissions settings are now stored per domain.

On Linux, the new Chrome 17 release, fixes the multi user selection bubble menu when using a custom theme.

With Google Chrome 15 now in the stable channel, Google Chrome 16 in the beta and Google Chrome 17 finally in the dev channel, development can continue as usual at Chrome for the next six weeks or so, before the version numbers get upgraded again.

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Expert Contributor 5th Nov, 2011 20:39
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November 5th, 2011, 16:18 GMT · By Lucian Parfeni
Firefox 8 Is Coming in 3 Days, Here's What You Need to Know

Firefox 8 is coming, appropriately, on November 8, just a few days from now. Since a new one comes out every six weeks, there aren't any ground-breaking features, but there's still plenty of new things in there so you're bound to enjoy at least some new features.

So, just as Mozilla is getting ready to roll out the new Firefox, here are the most notable features in the upcoming major release.

Twitter search is now included

Mozilla has made a change to the default search engines list. Along with the regular default options, Firefox now includes Twitter Search so you can check out the freshest news from the site with ease.

You can now switch to the new Twitter search which means that you can start a Twitter search from the search box, the Awesomebar and even from the "Search Twitter for *" context menu entry.

Tabs load on demand, at startup

One feature that power users are going to be very happy about in the new Firefox is the option of loading tabs on demand, when first starting up. If you're the type of user with at least 20 tabs open at all times, you know that starting Firefox and waiting for all of those to load is quite annoying.

If you choose to enable the "Don't load tabs until selected" option, now in the General tab of the Preferences screen, only the tabs that you see are loaded, the background ones are not. Then, as you click on a new one, those tabs will be loaded as well.

Firefox 8 will check for and disable add-ons installed by third party software

Finally, the big touted new feature in Firefox 8 is the third-party add-on checker. This tool, the first time after you update to Firefox 8, scans the installed add-ons and searches for those installed via and by third-party software, not from Mozilla's Add-ons repository or manually by the user.

Firefox disables these add-ons which more often then not provide no useful functionality, clutter up the interface and slow down Firefox, not to mention worse scenarios.

Once it's done, it presents a list of installed add-ons and gives the user the possibility to enable or disable anything they want.

Since add-ons installed by third-parties will be disabled by default, it is very likely that a lot of people are going to have a much cleaner Firefox and not even know what happened.

No more tab animations

One cool feature planned for Firefox 8 has been removed. Firefox 8 was to have smooth tab animations, for re-ordering and tearing them off.

During the beta phase, the feature seemed to perform quite nicely, but Mozilla has recently removed it and it is even disabled in the Firefox 9 Aurora builds. It's safe to say, Firefox 8 won't be getting tab animations.

Of course, Firefox 8 comes with plenty of updates under the hood, but these technical details usually don't interest regular users, apart from the memory performance improvement, perhaps.

http://news.softpedia.com/news/Firefox-8-Is-Coming...

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Expert Contributor 5th Nov, 2011 20:44
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SSL authority stops issuing certificates following breach

Here we go again
By Dan Goodin in San Francisco • Get more from this author

Yet another web authentication authority has stopped issuing secure sockets layer certificates after discovering a security breach that allowed hackers to store attack tools on one of its servers.

Netherlands-based KPN Corporate Market said it was taking the action while it investigated the compromise, which may have taken place as long as four years ago. The breach came to light after tools for waging distributed denial-of-service attacks were found on its network.

There is no evidence that the compromise affects KPN servers used to generate the certificates that Google, eBay, and millions of other services use to cryptographically prove their websites are authentic, rather than easily created imposters. But the possibility "can not be completely excluded," KPN officials said in a statement issued Friday (Google translation here).

The compromise underscores the fragility of an SSL system that's only as trustworthy as its most insecure, or most corrupt, member. With more than 600 certificate authorities trusted by the Internet Explorer, Chrome, and Firefox browsers, all that's required to mint a near-perfect replica of a credential for Google Mail, or any other website, is to pierce the defenses of a single authority's certificate issuance system. And with some of the authorities residing in countries such as China, it's not a stretch to imagine them being compelled to issue fraudulent certificates.

More at :-
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2011/11/04/ssl_still_...

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Expert Contributor 6th Nov, 2011 16:53
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Eggheads crack open web troll brains

Big headache discovered for smeared biz bosses
By Anna Leach • Get more from this author

Posted in Small Biz, 6th November 2011 13:04 GMT
People who fire off abuse online tend to be keyboard warriors who lack self-control and are fuelled by vengefulness while protected by cloaks of anonymity. And they're going to cost businesses a ton of cash as they struggle to defend their reputations.

This is according to a frankly shocking study published in the current issue of the Computers in Human Behavior journal.

More at :-
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2011/11/06/eggheads_p...

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Expert Contributor 6th Nov, 2011 17:01
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By Eduard Kovacs
Malaysian CA Issues 22 Weak Certificates

After the DigiNotar incident, it's the turn of a Malaysian CA to issue some dangerous certificates which may compromise the websites that utilize them.

According to Sophos, DigiCert Sbn. Bhd, which is unrelated to the US-based DigiCert, released 22 certificates for the Malaysian government, later turning out they were actually problematic.

The incident revealed a bundle of flaws in the certificates issued by the CA, one of the most important ones being the fact that they didn't contain an Extended Key Usage (EKU) which is utilized to inform the browser on what types of rights a digital certificate should have.

Another problem was related to the lack of revocation information, meaning that the certificates cannot be recalled in an unfortunate situation such as this one.

Entrust, the owner of DigiCert Sdn. Bhd, notified the parties involved and released a statement in which they revealed their plans to globally revoke the certificates of the affected company.

"It has been discovered that Digicert Malaysia has issued certificates with weak 512-bit RSA keys and missing certificate extensions. Their certificate issuing practices violated their agreement, their CPS, and accepted CA standards," reads their statement.

"Entrust believes that security companies have a duty to take action when security incidents like this occur. Upon discovery of the issues with Digicert Malaysia certificates, Entrust took immediate steps to address the situation to ensure the security of Entrust customers and all Internet users."

If at first everyone believed that the rogue certificates were not used in any malicious campaigns, it later turned out that two of the authorizations issued by DigiCert Sdn. Bhd were deployed in a spear phishing attack against another Asian CA.

Fortunately, the attack was discovered quickly and the damage caused was reduced to a minimum.

As a result of the hack, Microsoft and Mozilla are working on removing the certificates from their trusted lists. Others will probably soon follow.

http://news.softpedia.com/news/Malaysian-CA-Issues...


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Expert Contributor 6th Nov, 2011 17:06
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Microsoft Partly to Blame for Spread of Duqu

The TrueType font parsing engine is to blame but Microsoft views the risk as low ... for now.

By Sean Michael Kerner

For the last several weeks, the Duqu virus has been alive in the wild. While there had been some speculation as to how it infects systems, Microsoft has now admitted that a zero day flaw in Windows is partially to blame.

In a security advisory issued late Thursday, Microsoft disclosed a previously un-reported Windows flaw. The flaw attacks the TrueType font parsing engine Win32k component.

"An attacker who successfully exploited this vulnerability could run arbitrary code in kernel mode," Microsoft warned. "The attacker could then install programs; view, change, or delete data; or create new accounts with full user rights."

The Duqu malware was first identified on October 19 and has been connected by security researcher to the Stuxnet virus that hit Iran in 2010. F-Secure security researcher, Mikko Hyponnen recently said that Duqu shares source code with Stuxnet. Hyponnen also sees Duqu as being a pre-cursor to a new Stuxnet-type attack where Duqu is the data collection and target enumeration phase.

Duqu is already infecting machines worldwide. According to Symantec, six organizations in eight countries have confirmed Duqu infections. Microsoft noted in its advisory that they are aware of targeted attacks, however overall they see low customer impact at this time.

Microsoft has indentified at least one important mitigating factor which may help to reduce risk, as well.

"The vulnerability cannot be exploited automatically through e-mail," Microsoft stated. "For an attack to be successful, a user must open an attachment that is sent in an e-mail message."

More at :-
http://www.esecurityplanet.com/windows-security/mi...

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Expert Contributor 7th Nov, 2011 09:07
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Adidas websites go offline after hacking cyber-attack

Adidas said it discovered the attack on 3 November
Adidas has taken its website content offline after suffering what it described as a "sophisticated, criminal cyber-attack".

The German sportswear maker said it had no evidence that its consumers' data had been impacted, but that it was taking down the affected sites to protect visitors.

The news follows a series of attacks against Sony earlier in the year.

Millions of users details were compromised.

A statement from Adidas said that it discovered the incident on 3 November.

The firm said it had since put in place additional data security measures and had started to relaunch its websites.

"Nothing is more important to us than the privacy and security of our consumers' personal data," the statement added.

"We appreciate your understanding and patience during this time".

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-15614590

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Expert Contributor 8th Nov, 2011 11:18
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Hacked server' claims another certificate authority casualty >> ZDNet

"Dutch certificate authority KPN has issued a statement, confirming that it will cease issuing operations after a security breach was discovered. KPN, formerly known as Getronics, which issues SSL-certificates to validate the authenticity of secure websites, will cease issuing certificates after one of its servers had been hacked, thought to be as far back as four years ago. "It's another major blow to the integrity of the web, only a month since Dutch certificate authority Diginotar was hacked, potentially compromising the security of websites belonging to the Dutch government, Google, Facebook and even state intelligence services." Digital certificate authorities have been making Greece look like a stable member of the euro this year.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/technology/blog/2011/nov...

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Expert Contributor 8th Nov, 2011 11:24
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DNS cache poisonings
An attack on several Brazilian ISPs has exposed large numbers of their subscribers to malware attacks when they attempt to visit Hotmail, Gmail, and other trusted websites, security researchers have warned.

The attacks work by poisoning the domain name system cache that the service providers use to translate domain names such as google.com into internet protocol numbers such as 74.125.224.144. By replacing legitimate IP addresses with ones leading to servers controlled by attackers, the hack is causing end users to be surreptitiously directed to sites that exploit software vulnerabilities on their computers or trick them into installing malware.

“Last week, Brazil's web forums were alive with desperate cries for help from users who faced malicious redirections when trying to access websites such as YouTube, Gmail and Hotmail, as well as local market leaders including Uol, Terra and Globo,” Fabio Assolini, a researcher with antivirus provider Kaspersky Labs, wrote in a blog post published on Monday. “In all cases, users were asked to run a malicious file as soon as the website opened.”

More at :-
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2011/11/07/brazilian_...

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Expert Contributor 8th Nov, 2011 11:31
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The latest Dev channel seems to focus on Windows platform, as there is only one prominent change that affects all supported operating system; and that refers to fixing a possible hang caused by GPU usage.

The important changes on the Windows version of the browser include the re-instatement of the Native Client on the 64-bit platform. When fully developed, NaCl will allow software to run sandboxed in the browser.

Additional mending in Chrome 17.0.932.0 refers to a bug that caused the notification for missing plug-in to appear without a proper reason. The plug-in infobar ("An additional plug-in is required to display some elements on this page") would pop up even on websites such as YouTube, without informing which component needs to be installed.

Initial user reports suggested that Skype extension had something to do with the nag screen, as after disabling or uninstalling it the info bar would no longer appear. Luckily, the problem is now solved.

http://news.softpedia.com/news/In-Chrome-17-0-932-...

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Expert Contributor 8th Nov, 2011 12:26
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Sloppy certificate authorities put on notice
In the wake of GlobalSign, Comodo, and DigiNator attacks, Microsoft, Mozilla, and Opera revoke untrustworthy certs
By Roger A. Grimes | InfoWorldFollow @rogeragrimes


Microsoft has taken the unusually bold step of revoking the Windows Root Certificate Program's trust in a specific certification authority (CA), and the same CA is being blacklisted by browser makers Mozilla and Opera. These moves are not a reactionary maneuver to a malicious compromise, as seen with GlobalSign, Comodo, and DigiNator. Rather, they're the result of the CA, Digicert Sdn Bhd (Digicert Malaysia), having violated several key best practices. The decisions of Microsoft, Mozilla, and Opera -- with more vendors likely to follow -- should send a clear warning that the industry is becoming less tolerant of shoddy digital-certificate security, particularly in light of recent hacks.

In the case of Microsoft (my full-time employer), this means that Windows will no longer vouch for the CA as being trusted. Windows will not reflexively have the CA prepopulated or placed on demand in its Trusted Certificate Authorities container. If a user receives a digital certificate signed by Digicert, his or her application will probably display at least a digital certificate error and refuse to instantly accept it as trusted. Depending on the application, users may have the option to ignore the warning and proceed.

Read more at :-
http://www.infoworld.com/d/security/sloppy-certifi...

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Expert Contributor 8th Nov, 2011 14:15
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The Evercookie: Like trying to kill Steven Seagal

And running Java is just criminally irresponsible

By Trevor Pott • Get more from this author

Posted in Cloud, 8th November 2011 13:03 GMT
Part 2 In part one of this series, I explored the privacy threats presented by targeted advertising, and asked why we should care. Browser referral, social media buttons and cookies were examined as examples of basic methods used to track our movements across the internet.

I also explored why advertisers track us, and examined browser plugins that allow us to prevent it. Those plugins come in a few flavours, depending on the threat they are countering and whether or not they trust advertisers to play ball and honour our polite requests not to be tracked.

Not all advertisers play by the rules. Some legitimate websites belong to organisations that gather your personal information not for their corporate advertising use, but to sell it at a profit. These companies rarely play nice, and they certainly don’t limit themselves to the basic tracking methods discussed in part one.

Read more at :-
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2011/11/08/how_to_sta...

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Expert Contributor 8th Nov, 2011 15:39
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November 8th, 2011, 11:11 GMT · By Eduard Kovacs
Identities Sold for Cents on Fraud Sites

In his journeys in the underworld of the internet, security researcher Brian Krebs came across a website that since 2010 is selling sensitive information belonging to Americans for just a few dollars.

Social security numbers, birth dates and mother maiden names, all necessary to open an account on someone's behalf, are available to anyone with an evil plan in mind.

“The more credits you buy, the cheaper the searches are per credit: Six credits cost $4.99 (3.5 EUR); 35 credits cost $20.99 (14 EUR), and $100.99(70 EUR) buys you 230 credits. Customers with special needs to can avail themselves of the “reseller plan,” which promises 1,500 credits for $500.99(350 EUR), and 3,500 credits for $1000.99(700 EUR),” Krebs revealed.

If we consider that a successful hit costs three credits, imagine how many lives can be affected with someone who wants to make a smart investment.

These sort of websites also offer package deals for those who want to launch mass operations, but they also give the opportunity for a future cybercriminal to be picky, allowing him to search for the information of a specific individual.

It turns out that if purchased in bulk, 20,000 complete identities can go as low as nine cents per record, while details from the premium database can go as high as sixteen cents. The number of records is not clear but the owners of the domain claim that 99% of American citizens can be found in their database.

The initial investigations revealed that this website might be controlled by a known Vietnamese hacker, but as it turns out, he is merely reselling another site's products as his own.

Unfortunately, you never know when your name ends up in their databases, especially since they claim to be making daily updates, so be very careful with suspicious emails, set strong passwords and most importantly, avoid handing out personal information online.

http://news.softpedia.com/news/Identities-Sold-For...

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Expert Contributor 9th Nov, 2011 07:42
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Chrome Beta Channel Update
Tuesday, November 8, 2011 | 17:46
Labels: Beta updates
The Beta channel has been updated to 16.0.912.32 for Windows, Mac, Linux, and Chrome Frame.

For an overview of key features in this release check out the Google Chrome Blog. Interested in switching to the Beta or Stable channels? Find out how. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug.

Anthony Laforge
Google Chrome
http://googlechromereleases.blogspot.com/

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Expert Contributor 9th Nov, 2011 07:49
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Last edited on 9th Nov, 2011 07:49
Microsoft patches critical Windows 7 bug, downplays exploit threat
No fix for Duqu flaw, but quashes different bug in same TrueType parsing engine
By Gregg Keizer

Microsoft today delivered four security updates that patched four vulnerabilities in Windows, most of them affecting the newer editions of Vista and Windows 7. Only one of the updates was marked "critical," Microsoft's most-serious threat ranking. Two of the remaining were labeled "important" and the fourth was tagged as "moderate."

As expected, Microsoft did not patch the Windows kernel vulnerability exploited by the Duqu campaign.

Top on Microsoft's chart today -- and on outside researchers' to-do lists as well -- was the MS10-083 update that patches a bug in Windows Vista's, Windows 7's, and Windows Server 2008's TCP/IP stack, which regulates Internet connections. The vulnerability could be used by attackers in certain circumstances to hijack an unpatched PC, said Microsoft, which nevertheless downplayed the likelihood of successful attacks

More at :-
http://www.infoworld.com/d/security/microsoft-patc...

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Expert Contributor 9th Nov, 2011 22:12
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Microsoft's Russinovich: How to stop a real 'Zero Day' disaster
The technical fellow has penned a scarily realistic malware disaster novel and shares with InfoWorld his tips for avoiding his characters' fates

By J. Peter Bruzzese | InfoWorld

I've just finished reading the book "Zero Day" by Mark Russinovich. This is the first fiction book that has computers and technology at the heart of it where I didn't angrily shout to the invisible author about the inaccuracy of the tech storyline. Even though the story is a work of fiction, the technical portion is spot-on -- and downright scary. But that makes sense considering Russinovich's background: He's a technical fellow at Microsoft, the senior-most technical position there, but is known globally for his contribution to the IT community through the Sysinternals tools many of us have used at one time or another.

The story involves the release of different types of viruses and rootkits that have the ability to do everything from crashing planes to overheating nuclear power plants to swiping company data and billing records, crushing entire companies. Sounds impossible? Perhaps you didn't read the headlines earlier this month that highlighted a computer virus in the cockpits of the U.S. drone fleet that logged every keystroke of these drones while they flew missions over war zones. Yes, the danger is very real, and combined with a great storyline (which I won't spoil -- read it for yourself), it had me on the edge of my seat.

More at :-
http://www.infoworld.com/d/microsoft-windows/micro...

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Expert Contributor 9th Nov, 2011 22:19
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Mozilla releases Firefox 8 and Thunderbird 8

Keeps to its six week schedule
By Lawrence Latif
Wed Nov 09 2011, 17:18
OPEN SOURCE OUTFIT Mozilla released Firefox 8 earlier today.
Mozilla's rapid-release schedule meant that Firefox 8 was out the door just six weeks after Firefox 7 hit the download mirrors. The latest version of the popular web browser adds Twitter search and improvements to WebGL, among other additions and improvements.
Mozilla has made general improvements and bug fixes in Firefox 8 but this release focuses on WebGL, a standard that offers hardware-accelerated 3D graphics without the need for plug-ins. Firefox 8 has support for cross-origin resource sharing, effectively allowing developers to securely load textures from multiple domains, which is a pretty important feature for cheap and easy load balancing.
As is standard practice, Mozilla also released Firefox 8 for Android and Thunderbird 8 at the same time. The latest Firefox for Android has Master Password, which stores usernames and passwords and should, in theory, keep those details safe even if your Android device is lost or stolen.
Mozilla's Thunderbird 8 messaging client now runs on the Gecko 8 engine and primarily fixes security vulnerabilities, disables add-ons that were installed by third party programs by default and makes changes to attachment processing. The Enigmail PGP security add-on has not been updated to be compatible with Thunderbird 8 yet, however, so those who use Enigmail might want to wait awhile before upgrading Thunderbird.

More at :-
http://www.theinquirer.net/inquirer/news/2123962/m...

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Expert Contributor 10th Nov, 2011 06:58
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Stable Channel Update for Chromebooks
Wednesday, November 9, 2011 | 15:45
Labels: Chrome OS, Stable updates
The Google Chrome team is happy to announce the release of Chrome 15 on the Stable Channel for Chromebooks (Acer AC700, Samsung Series 5, and Cr-48).

Chrome version 15.0.874.117 (Platform version: 1011.118)

Release highlights:
New Chrome 15 functionality (check out the Official Chrome Blog for more information)
New Web UI Login
Support playback of key media codecs
Improve video decode performance
Add concept of preferred networks
New ‘Games’ and ‘Music’ apps by default
NTFS support
Add localized text for recovery
Networking improvements
Crash fixes
Security updates
If you find new issues, please let us know by visiting our help site or filing a bug. Interested in switching to the Beta channel? Find out how. You can submit feedback using ‘Report an issue’ under the wrench menu.

Josafat Garcia
Google Chrome

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Expert Contributor 10th Nov, 2011 07:08
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DOJ charges seven in massive clickjacking scheme
The Justice Department is indicting seven individuals with hijacking more than 4 million computers across 100 countries
By Agam Shah and Joab Jackson

The U.S. Department of Justice is charging seven individuals with 27 counts of wire fraud and other computer-related crimes, alleging that the group hijacked four million computers across 100 countries in a sophisticated clickjacking scheme.

The DOJ is holding a press conference in New York at 1 p.m. to reveal further details of the indictment, which has been filed in the U.S. District Court of New York.

According to the indictment, the defendants had set up a phony Internet advertising agency, entering into agreements with online ad providers that would pay the group whenever its ads where clicked on by users. The group's malware, which they had planted on millions of user computers, would redirect the computers' browsers to its advertisements, thereby generating illicit revenue

Read more at :-
http://www.infoworld.com/d/security/doj-charges-se...

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Expert Contributor 10th Nov, 2011 19:20
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Steam Forums Hacked?

Forum users' e-mail addresses may have been accessed.

November 09,
According to Eurogamer, the Steam gaming forums have been taken down following an apparent security breach.

"The outlet states that a message board in the forums was 'defaced' Monday night; the forums were subsequently taken down and replaced with a message from Steam stating they are 'offline for maintenance,'" writes Ars Technica's Casey Johnston.

"Because some players have reported receiving spam with similar content to the material illicitly splashed across the forums, it's possible that whoever hacked the site may have obtained the e-mail addresses of users who have registered with the site," Johnston writes.

Go to "Steam forums taken offline following possible security breach" to read the details.

http://www.esecurityplanet.com/hackers/steam-forum...

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Expert Contributor 10th Nov, 2011 19:28
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November 10th, 2011, 14:44 GMT · By Eduard Kovacs
Internauts Beware of the 'Twelve Scams of Christmas'

As Christmas is approaching and people surf the internet in their quest to find the perfect presents for their loved ones, cybercriminals are not wasting any time, also preparing for the special occasion by launching tons of malicious operations.

McAfee issued a bulletin in which they inform users on the most dangerous schemes that are expected to be seen online in the near future.

Since recent surveys showed that mobile devices will be intensely utilized for Christmas shopping, it's expected that the number of mobile pieces of malware will increase considerably. Also watch out for apps that might promise to show you where the best deals are. Colorful software can easily hide malicious programs that send SMSs to premium rate numbers.

Facebook promotions are not a novelty, but around the time of the holidays these scams will certainly record an increase in numbers. Also related to social media, make sure not to announce the world that you're away from home in case you take a vacation, since robbers can use the information to attack your home.

Fake anti-virus software, scareware and even phishing scams might also come in the form of a fabulous deal. Holiday screensavers must be treated with suspicion, as they can easily hide malevolent elements that spy for your assets.

Individuals and companies can expect a lot of emails. Banks, delivery firms and hotels might contact you to inform you of something. However, if the messages contain a link or an attachment, you can be almost certain they're not from the legitimate institutions.

The mystery shopper scam can also take another form during this season as many might be tempted to think that someone actually wants to hire them to secretly visit stores.

“Cybercriminals rub their hands with glee when they think of the holidays. Consumers are making travel plans, shopping for gifts and bargains, updating Facebook and connecting with friends. However, the vast majority have no security protection for their smartphones or tablets, despite using them heavily during the holiday season,” reveals Gary Davis, director of consumer product marketing at McAfee.

“Consumers need to stay one step ahead of this season’s cyber-scrooges, and make sure they have protection for all of their Internet-enabled devices. Otherwise, they could risk giving the bad guys the biggest gift of all – their own personal and financial information.”

http://news.softpedia.com/news/Internauts-Beware-o...

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Expert Contributor 10th Nov, 2011 21:17
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Chrome Stable Channel Update
Thursday, November 10, 2011 | 07:30
Labels: Stable updates

The Stable channel has been updated to 15.0.874.120 for Windows, Mac, Linux and Chrome Frame platforms

All
Updated V8 - 3.5.10.23
Fix small print sizing issues (issues: 102186, 82472, 102154)
This new build also contains a new version of Flash which contains security fixes.
Mac
Fixed the "certificate is not yet valid" error for server certificate issued by a VeriSign intermediate CA. (issue 101555)
Security fixes and rewards:
Please see the Chromium security page for more detail. Note that the referenced bugs may be kept private until a majority of our users are up to date with the fix.
[$500] [100465] High CVE-2011-3892: Double free in Theora decoder. Credit to Aki Helin of OUSPG.
[$500] [100492] [100543] Medium CVE-2011-3893: Out of bounds reads in MKV and Vorbis media handlers. Credit to Aki Helin of OUSPG.
[101172] High CVE-2011-3894: Memory corruption regression in VP8 decoding. Credit to Andrew Scherkus of the Chromium development community.
[$1000] [101458] High CVE-2011-3895: Heap overflow in Vorbis decoder. Credit to Aki Helin of OUSPG.
[101624] High CVE-2011-3896: Buffer overflow in shader variable mapping. Credit to Ken “strcpy” Russell of the Chromium development community.
[102242] High CVE-2011-3897: Use-after-free in editing. Credit to pa_kt reported through ZDI (ZDI-CAN-1416).
[102461] Low CVE-2011-3898: Failure to ask for permission to run applets in JRE7. Credit to Google Chrome Security Team (Chris Evans).
The bugs [100465], [100492], [100543] and [101458] were detected using AddressSanitizer.


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Expert Contributor 11th Nov, 2011 10:21
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November 11th, 2011, 08:04 GMT · By Eduard Kovacs
Adobe Rolls Out Security Updates with Flash Player 11.1

Adobe released the latest variant for Flash Player and Air. The 11.1, respectively the 3.1 versions come with crucial security updates that patch vulnerabilities which could have allowed an attacker to take control of an infected system.

The company recommends that all users who currently rely on the older versions to update in order to prevent any unfortunate situations.

According to the security bulletin issued by Adobe, Flash Player 11.0.1.152 and earlier version for operating systems such as Windows, Linux, Mac and Solaris were affected by the weaknesses fixed in the latest release.

Android users who currently have the 11.0.1.153 variant or previous ones are also advised to download the last release.

The critical flaws identified in the earlier versions may have caused a machine to crash or they might have allowed a cybercriminal to execute arbitrary code.

Memory corruption, heap corruption, buffer and stack overflow vulnerabilities could allow an attacker to execute pieces of malicious code, while in Internet explorer a flaw may have led to a cross-domain policy bypass.

To fix the issues mentioned above, Adobe had help from a lot of contributors. Among them are Tavis Ormandy and Ben Hawkes of the Google Security Team, an anonymous individual through iDefense's Vulnerability Contributor Program, Bo Qu of Palo Alto Networks, lakehu of Tencent Security Center and Ivan Golenkov and Alexander Gostev of Kaspersky Lab

The updates can be made through the product since it will probably prompt customers to alert them on the availability of a new variant. For users who are having problems in the update process, Adobe released a patched version of Flash Player 10 which can be downloaded from their website.


http://news.softpedia.com/news/Adobe-Rolls-Out-Sec...

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Expert Contributor 11th Nov, 2011 16:41
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Patched Adobe Flash SWF Vulnerability Still Makes Victims

While Adobe patched the SWF file vulnerability a long time ago, users who failed to update their browser plug-ins are still highly targeted by attacks that rely on the outdated version of Flash Player.

Zscaler researchers noticed the phenomenon which still makes a lot of victims out of the 7% of customers who still use an old version of the software.

In April 2011, Adobe made sure the weakness that would allow a cybercriminal to execute arbitrary code or launch a denial of service attack by using specially crafted Flash content, would never hurt any of their customers who updated the player to the latest versions.

Now, it turns out that since many still rely on the old variants, they become easy targets for hackers who encapsulate malevolent swf files into Microsoft Office documents or html pages.

A location discovered recently by the experts embedded a nb.swf flash file into a page which was executed by Adobe's Flash Player when the site was loaded. The execution of the specially crafted element leads to a memory corruption in the player that allows for a piece of shellcode to be passed on as an input parameter.

At the time when it was discovered, only half of the security vendors listed in Virus Total detected the swf file as a threat.

“Flash and other browser plugins remain a popular target for attackers, even for known vulnerabilities that have been patched for some time. This is because attackers know that plugins regularly remain unpatched for some time,” states a Zscaler researcher.

http://news.softpedia.com/news/Patched-Adobe-Flash...

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Expert Contributor 11th Nov, 2011 21:25
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Forrester to security pros: Think before rushing to fix security holes
Report advises not fixing security holes immediately after a data breach since that could destroy evidence needed to prosecute cyber criminals
By Ellen Messmer |


Forrester Research this week published a report that advises security professionals not to jump the gun on fixing security deficiencies immediately after a data breach is identified since that could destroy valuable evidence needed to prosecute cyber criminals.

In the report "Planning for Failure," Forrester analysts John Kindervag and Rick Holland make the argument that rushing to fix security after a data breach could be the wrong approach. "You must decide if you want to prosecute before you remediate," the report argues. "Things work differently in real life than it does on your favorite crime investigation show. Too often, companies clean up a breach and then decide later they want to find and prosecute the perpetrator."

Read more at :-
http://www.infoworld.com/d/security/forrester-secu...

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Expert Contributor 12th Nov, 2011 12:01
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Hackers may have spent years crafting Duqu
Gang customized attack files for each target, says Kaspersky Lab
By Gregg Keizer | Computerworld

The hacker group behind Duqu may have been working on its attack code for more than four years, new analysis of the Trojan revealed Friday.

Moscow-based Kaspersky Lab published some findings today from a recent rooting through Duqu samples provided by researchers in the Sudan, saying that one driver included with the attack payload was compiled in August 2007, extending the timeline of the gang's work.

"We can't be 100 percent sure [of that date], but all the compiled dates of other files seem to match to attacks," said Roel Schouwenberg, a senior researcher with Kaspersky, in an interview today. "So we're leaning towards that date as correct."

Read more at
http://www.infoworld.com/d/security/hackers-may-ha...

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Expert Contributor 12th Nov, 2011 12:08
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Steam Hack Confirmed, Affects 35 Million Users

User names, hashed and salted passwords, game purchases, e-mail addresses, billing addresses and encrypted credit card numbers may have been accessed.

Users of the Steam gaming network have been warned that their account information may have been accessed by hackers.

"The warning came after an investigation of a Web site defacement that affected Steam's forums on November 6th," writes Threatpost's Christopher Brook.

"Hackers were able to bypass the message boards and access the site’s database, according to a message sent to the site’s users last night by Steam co-founder Gabe Newell," Brook writes. "The database contained customer’s user names, hashed and salted passwords, game purchases, email addresses, billing addresses and encrypted credit card numbers, according to the note."

Go to "Steam's 35 Million Users Compromised in Hack" to read the details.

http://www.esecurityplanet.com/hackers/steam-hack-...

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Expert Contributor 12th Nov, 2011 12:18
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The official list for the latest Firefox Aurora is out. Pinned at the top is the entry informing that the “forward” button is not present at all times on Windows. It is hidden until you need it, that is until you hit the “back” button.

New features listed in the new version include implementation of Anti-Aliasing for WebGL, a new CSS Style Inspector as well as support for CSS3 3D-Transforms. Additionally, developers have the chance to create web apps that can offer a full screen HTML experience thanks to full screen APIs now being enabled.

As for the fixes, some of the most notable bugs would cause the browser to crash upon moving bookmarks. Also, the back and forward buttons would not function when visiting Google+.

The current version of Aurora does not include any of the expected features since they are either in development or on the way of being implemented.

http://news.softpedia.com/news/Firefox-Aurora-10-H...

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Expert Contributor 12th Nov, 2011 18:02
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All avast! editions have been updated to a new beta version, although the Czech developer has not announced the move officially just yet. The official release is planned for the next days.

However, you can download the latest beta for avast! Free, Pro and Internet Security, as the company’s CTO, Ondřej Vlček, made them available on avast!’s forum.

avast! 6.0.1351 includes important changes for various components, starting with Script Shield, which now works with Google Chrome and supports all versions of Firefox and Adobe Reader and features more options, just like Web Shield component. WebRep plug-in underwent some improvements, especially for Internet Explorer.

The new version should sport a sturdier sandbox and aswSP.sys (avast!’s self-protection system driver file) and Internet Security edition comes with a new anti-spam engine. avast! Market has been introduced in the user interface as well.

You can download avast! Free from this page
You can download avast! Pro from this page
You can download avast! Internet Security from this page

http://news.softpedia.com/news/New-Beta-Version-of...

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Expert Contributor 12th Nov, 2011 21:59
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Boost for move to new net addressing scheme

Time is running out for the net's older addressing scheme

Efforts to shift the internet to a new addressing system have been boosted by US internet service provider Comcast.

The firm has begun switching some customers over to a system built around the net's new addressing scheme, called IP Version 6 (IPv6).

The change is needed because the older version has almost exhausted its pool of available addresses.

Some small UK ISPs have also begun putting domestic customers on a network that uses the new system.

Comcast is carrying out a trial in Pleasanton, California that will see some customers in the town being connected to a network built around IPv6. To do this they will need home hardware that can handle IPv6 and its forerunner- IPv4.

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http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-15691319

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Expert Contributor 13th Nov, 2011 14:49
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By Eduard Kovacs
Dutch ISPs: Pirate Bay Shutdown Could Affect Entire Network

Two of the largest internet service providers from the Netherlands stated in a court of law that blocking their account holders from accessing the infamous Pirate Bay website could have undesired effects on their network.

TorrentFreak reports that BREIN, a Dutch anti-piracy outfit, wants to order ISPs to implement a blockade that would prevent the accessing of TPB, but two of the largest companies, Ziggo and Xs4all, are arguing that such a restriction is not as easy as some believe.

While BREIN believes that the internet providers have the means to easily restrict the torrent website, the ISPs claim that it's not only a technical challenge, but also a violation of human rights and freedom of expression.

Xs4all representatives state that the ones who own the site should be held responsible for copyright issues instead of those who merely facilitate the access.

BREIN on the other hand says that the freedom of expression arguments don't hold water, highlighting the fact that copyright owners also have the right to protect what's theirs.

The anti-pirates claim that the main reason for which the Ziggo and Xs4all won't set up the blockade is because they profit from the controversial website. The fear of losing customers is one of the main concerns ISPs have related to such restrictions.

While TPB founders are struggling to get out of jail and out of the obligations to pay enormous fines, the website they created is long debated around the world between rights groups and ISPs.

In Belgium, each and every provider was forced to block their account holders from accessing the BitTorrent site, but due to an error in the court order, companies could take advantage of the slip to continue providing account holders access to the website.

http://news.softpedia.com/news/Dutch-ISPs-Pirate-B...

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Expert Contributor 14th Nov, 2011 11:46
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SECURITY RESEARCH OUTFIT Crysys, the group credited with spotting the Duqu virus, has released a tool that lets average internet users do the same.
The Duqu virus was discovered early in November by the Budapest-based Laboratory of Cryptography and System Security (Crysys), and found to spread due to a security hole in Windows.
Microsoft has released a workaround for firms worried about the vulnerability, but companies still concerned about it might want to use the Crysys tool for spotting it.
"We developed a detector toolkit that combines simple detection techniques to find Duqu infections on a computer or in a whole network," explained the security researchers.
"The toolkit contains signature and heuristics based methods and it is able to find traces of infections where components of the malware are already removed from the system."
A number of tools are packaged together in the detector, and Crysys said that they are able to spot different kinds of suspicious activity on machines such as, for example, the presence of malicious files.
The four executable components, FindDuquSys.exe, CalcPNFEntropy.exe, FindDuquTmp.exe, and FindPNFnoINF.exe, search for different types of infections, according to the tool's supporting information. The researchers warned that users should inspect any flagged files to look for false positives, and recommended that a security professional do this.
They added that it is simple to use and easy to analyse, and could be used in specialised environments such as critical infrastructures. The toolkit is released under the GPLv3 license. µ

http://www.theinquirer.net/inquirer/news/2124658/d...

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Expert Contributor 14th Nov, 2011 11:57
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Exorcise Ghost Click from Your PC
Analysis: The FBI just took down a criminal botnet that hijacked more 4 million PCs worldwide. Is your PC among those haunted by Ghost Click?
By Dan Tynan, ITworld
Yeah, I know: you just can’t get enough news about Herman Cain, Joe Paterno, and that aircraft carrier-sized asteroidthat just went whizzing by our planet. But you may have missed a story that is in many ways more important: Operation Ghost Click.

Earlier this week the FBI and international law authorities took down the biggest criminal botnet yet – some 4 million zombie PCs, all controlled by a band of Estonian cyber thieves doing business as an allegedly legitimate company called Rove Digital (no relation to Karl).

Rove performed all kinds of digital malfeasance -- including the sale of fake antivirus software, distribution of malware, replacing legitimate ads on Web sites with their own, and generating fake clicks to pull in ad revenue – while pretending to be a real IT firm.

They did it by distributing malware that took over the Domain Name System (DNS) settings on PCs and network routers. DNS servers translate URLs (like www.itworld.com) into IP addresses (like 66.77.79.139) that can be read by Internet routers. Change the DNS table to match a legit URL with an illegitimate IP address, and you can do all kinds of nasty things to the computers that visit that Web site.

To maximize their reach, Rove hijacked popular sites like iTunes, Netflix, and IRS.gov. The FBI estimates they made at least $14 million through these deeds. But that’s only the money they could find. The actual proceeds are likely an order of magnitude higher.

More at :-
http://www.pcworld.com/article/243766/exorcise_gho...

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Expert Contributor 14th Nov, 2011 13:13
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1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13

Wi-Fi security do's and don'ts
Wi-Fi is inherently susceptible to hacking and eavesdropping, but it can be secure if you use the right security measures. Unfortunately, the Web is full of outdated advice and myths, but here are some do's and don'ts of Wi-Fi security addressing some of these myths.

Master your security with InfoWorld's interactive Security iGuide

http://www.infoworld.com/d/security/wi-fi-security...

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Expert Contributor 14th Nov, 2011 13:49
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Large-scale data theft fazes Finnish police

Finnish police on Monday called on users of online services to change their passwords after nearly 15,000 user names and passwords were stolen and published on the Internet.


"If I could get one message across to people, it would be to change your passwords, especially the important ones," Timo Piiroinen of the National Bureau of Investigation told AFP.
Piiroinen confirmed that the 14,600 passwords posted online late Saturday night appeared to be connected to a previous incident, in which the personal data of nearly 16,000 Finns were hacked into and made public.
"We have been told that some passwords match email addresses in the earlier incident," he explained.
Police are investingating the two indicents as part of a larger case of identity and data theft.
"We are treating both cases as connected," Piiroinen said.

http://www.physorg.com/news/2011-11-large-scale-th...

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Large-scale data theft fazes Finnish police

Finnish police on Monday called on users of online services to change their passwords after nearly 15,000 user names and passwords were stolen and published on the Internet.


"If I could get one message across to people, it would be to change your passwords, especially the important ones," Timo Piiroinen of the National Bureau of Investigation told AFP.
Piiroinen confirmed that the 14,600 passwords posted online late Saturday night appeared to be connected to a previous incident, in which the personal data of nearly 16,000 Finns were hacked into and made public.
"We have been told that some passwords match email addresses in the earlier incident," he explained.
Police are investingating the two indicents as part of a larger case of identity and data theft.
"We are treating both cases as connected," Piiroinen said.

http://www.physorg.com/news/2011-11-large-scale-th...

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Expert Contributor 14th Nov, 2011 17:34
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Denmark ISPs May Be Forced to Block Grooveshark

After the success they recorded in Denmark with the massive blockade set against The Pirate Bay, copyright holders acquired a new target in the form of Grooveshark, a website known internationally for their music streaming services.

Accroding to TorrentFreak, the anti-piracy organization called RettighedsAlliancen revealed its intentions of going after the site, requesting a full DNS restriction just like in the case of the infamous BitTorrent site.

“When you want to offer music on the Danish market, one must have an agreement with rightholders to do so. Grooveshark does not and has been completely uncooperative,” said RettighedsAlliancen's chief Maria Fredenslund.

Even though such websites were never considered before as being illegal, now it seems that since similar paid services, such as Spotify, made their way into the country, sites that offer free services may be forced to pay or terminate any activities.

“There is a burgeoning market for online music that we believe it is necessary to support. We are in a situation where the market will die if Grooveshark continues.”

While some fully support DNS blockades against such sites, many believe that if a precedent is set, sites like Youtube and Facebook could follow since they offer similar services.

More at :-
http://news.softpedia.com/news/Denmark-ISPs-May-Be...

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Expert Contributor 14th Nov, 2011 20:22
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F-Secure finds malware signed with stolen digital certificate
The certifcate allowed the malicious software to appear legitimate when installed

By Jeremy Kirk
IDG News Service - Researchers from security vendor F-Secure have spotted a rare malicious software sample that carried a valid code-signing certificate from a Malaysian governmental institution.

A code-signing certificate is a kind of digital signature that ensures the authenticity and integrity of an application to be run on a computer. Malicious software programs often present fake digital signatures, but ones that are legitimate and attached to malware are rare, said Mikko Hypponen, chief research officer for F-Secure.

The certificate was signed by "anjungnet.mardi.gov.my," which is part of Malaysia's Agricultural Research and Development Institute. Hypponen said F-Secure contacted the organization, which then found that a Windows server responsible for generating the certificates had been hacked.

The organization said it was unsure how long the server may have been compromised, Hypponen said.

Read more at
http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9221800/F_S...

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Expert Contributor 14th Nov, 2011 21:29
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Web privacy tools to warn of internet tracking cookies

The technologies will help users manage how much sites know about who they are

Internet users will receive a warning if sites do not respect their privacy thanks to new tools being developed by the web's standards setting body.

The World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) wants to help users control how their personal data is managed.

It is designing controls to shield personal data and reveal when sites do not honour privacy requests.

The W3C now wants users, browser makers and businesses to help finish and implement the specifications.

Read more at :-
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-15723407

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Chrome Dev Channel Update
Monday, November 14, 2011 | 16:13
Labels: Dev updates

The Dev channel has been updated to 17.0.938.0 for Windows, Mac, Linux, and Chrome Frame. This build contains the following updates:
Updated V8 - 3.7.6.0. This release includes the new garbage collector.
Windows: Fixed a bug where the missing plug-in infobar would not do anything (issue 103216).
Full details about what changes are in this build are available in the SVN revision log. Interested in switching release channels? Find out how. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug.

Dharani Govindan
Google Chrome
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http://googlechromereleases.blogspot.com/

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November 15th, 2011, 07:54 GMT · By Eduard Kovacs
More on...Malaysian Government Certificate Used to Sign Malware.
Another incident involving digital certificates has been discovered. In this situation a piece of malware has been found to be signed by a certificate stolen from a government institution in Malaysia.

F-Secure's Mikko Hypponen reports that even though these situations are rare, they're not quite uncommon.

“It's not that common to find a signed copy of malware. It's even rarer that it's signed with an official key belonging to a government,” Hypponen reveals.

Cybercriminals will steal or even create themselves certificates which will make a malicious software seem more trustworthy in the eyes of the operating system and even the security solutions.

While unsigned applications can raise a lot of flags, signed applications, especially those that benefit from the signature of legitimate institutions, will be treated like a harmless element.

In this particular case, a malicious PDF file was discovered as being signed by anjungnet.mardi.gov.my which actually belonged to the Malaysian Agricultural Research and Development Institute. Malaysian authorities report that the certificate used to validate the malevolent file was stolen “some time ago.”

“The malware itself has been spread via malicious PDF files that drop it after exploiting Adobe Reader 8. The malware downloads additional malicious components from a server called worldnewsmagazines.org. Some of those components are also signed, although this time by an entity called www.esupplychain.com.tw,” Hypponen said.

The trojan was identified as Trojan-Downloader:W32/Agent.DTIW but fortunately, the certificate that validated it expired in September, which means it won't have the upper hand against security products any more.

In the recent period we've seen a lot of situations where cybercriminals hacked CAs to steal certificates that they can later use in malicious operations. In Malaysia, DigiCert Sbn. Bhd was discovered issuing 22 weak certificates, while in the Netherlands KPN stopped releasing them after discovering a DDoS tool on one of their servers which many have been there for about four years.

http://news.softpedia.com/news/Malaysian-Governmen...

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Old Java versions breed new security exploits
You may be tempted to keep various versions of Java running on your systems, but doing so leaves you exposed to security threats
By Roger A. Grimes | InfoWorld

There's no denying the popularity of Java, as evidenced by its ubiquity on home and work systems worldwide. But it's easy for computers -- both in homes and at organizations -- to have multiple versions of Java installed, thus exposing those systems to security exploits. IT admins need to do a better job of closing those holes. One critical step, which I've recommended for years, is for admins and users to update to the most recent version of Java (applications permitting) and to remove all other existing versions.

Java's security shortcomings are well documented. It, along with Adobe products, made up all top 10 successful exploit spots last year, according to Kaspersky. What's more, Microsoft's Security Intelligence Report 11 noted that Java was "responsible for between one-third and one-half of all [recent] exploits." Over the past six months, I've found Java to be the most common exploit vector in all the cases I've personally investigated. Even Oracle recommends that customers remove old versions of Java and use only the latest patched versions.

More at :-
http://www.infoworld.com/d/security/old-java-versi...

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Hackers in Brazil have for the first time created malware that uses encrypted blocks of code to sneak around antivirus programs
By James Mulroy | PC World

Malware just got sneaky! Well, sneakier, that is. Attackers in Brazil have found a way to sneak around antivirus programs by using cryptography.

Recently Dmitry Bestuzhev, Kaspersky Lab's Head of Global Research and Analysis Team for Latin America, was looking over some potentially malicious links from Brazil when he discovered some files with .jpeg filename extensions. At first glance, Bestuzhev thought that they were some form of steganography -- the art and science of hiding messages. But upon further inspection, the researcher discovered that they were actually more like .bmp (bitmap) files, than JPEGs.

The data contained within the files themselves was obviously encrypted and contained some kind of malware; Bestuzhev later discovered that the data was in the form of block ciphers, a cryptographic method that encrypts 128-bit blocks of plain text into 128-bit blocks of cipher text. Since block ciphers can only be composed of 128-bit blocks, they must break up the message into several blocks and encrypt each one individually. A process called modes of operation allows a cryptographer to repeatedly use block ciphers to encrypt an entire program -- or piece of malware, in this case.

More at :-
http://www.infoworld.com/d/security/attackers-get-...

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'Do Not Track' standard edges towards daylight

First draft of spybuster deal released by W3C
By Kelly Fiveash •
Posted in Cloud Business, 15th November 2011 19:27 GMT
An internet standard on online privacy is expected to be published by the middle of next year. In the meantime, the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) has released a first draft of the so-called "Do Not Track" (DNT) mechanism, with input from the major browser makers.

Google, Mozilla, Apple and Microsoft have been debating with privacy groups and government regulators over what standard should be adopted.

But getting companies to find a consensus on what mechanism should be introduced that allows browser makers, social networks and other online outfits to profit from advertising while satisfying privacy watchdogs has proved, to say the least, problematic.

More at :-
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2011/11/15/do_not_tra...

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Worm Comes as Office Genuine Advantage Checker on IM

An executable file that usually comes through instant messaging applications, pretending to be an Office Genuine Advantage Checker, turns out to be a malicious worm that opens a backdoor to allow attackers to take over the controls of a machine.

Bitdefender researchers report that the file, programmed in Visual Basic, comes as an executable called office_genuine.exe and even though Microsoft retired its OGA program almost a year ago, the application that pretends to check the legitimacy of Office products is still circulating.

The piece of malware, identified as Win32.Worm.Coidung.B, doesn't come by itself, instead it brings a guest in the form of a file infector detected as Win32.Virtob. It's not yet certain if they were combined on purpose or if the latter got a piggyback ride by mistake.

More at :-
http://news.softpedia.com/news/Worm-Comes-as-Offic...

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Microsoft to streamline Windows 8's patch process
Tweaks to updating, rebooting of patched PCs will improve security, say experts

By Gregg Keizer

Computerworld - Microsoft will reduce the number of distracting restarts for updates to Windows 8, part of its plan to simplify how people interact with the upcoming operating system, a company manager said today.

Security experts, including ones who have criticized Microsoft's updating practices in the past, applauded the changes.

"Streamlining the update effort and the better messaging is smart," said Wolfgang Kandek, chief technology officer with Qualys. "I like the improvements."

Some, though not all, of Microsoft's security and feature updates demand a PC reboot to finish installation because the code slated for changing is currently in use, said Farzana Rahman, the group program manager for Windows Update, in a long blog post today.

Read more at :-
http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9221858/Mic...

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Microsoft outlines its Windows Embedded roadmap

Wants to be a part of intelligent systems
By Lawrence Latif

SOFTWARE REDEVELOPER Microsoft has outed a roadmap of sorts for its Windows Embedded operating system.
Microsoft's Windows Embedded is already in a vast range of devices and while the world and his dog are looking towards Windows 8 on tablets, Microsoft wants to push Windows Embedded even further. Kevin Dallas, general manager for Windows Embedded at Microsoft laid out some of the firm's plans for the embedded operating system, claiming it will be a central part of "the move toward intelligent systems".
Dallas introduced Windows Embedded Enterprise v.Next, which the firm is saying provides full Windows application compatibility on embedded devices in ATMs and kiosks. Dallas claimed Microsoft will release this operating system within three months of Windows 8 shipping.

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http://www.theinquirer.net/inquirer/news/2125184/m...

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Dev Channel Update for Chromebooks
Tuesday, November 15, 2011 | 16:09
Labels: Chrome OS, Dev updates
The Dev Channel has been updated to 16.0.912.38 (Platform version: 1193.52.0) for Chromebooks (Acer AC700, Samsung Series 5, and Cr-48).

Release highlights:

A number of functionality and stability fixes
Flash updated to 11.0.31.110


Known issues:

After autoupdate, the UI may freeze on first boot after logging in. This problem happens less frequently if you wait 60+ seconds to login. Workaround - If you encounter this hang, press the power button to force the Chromebook to shutdown, then restart. The machine should behave normally after that.


If you find new issues, please let us know by visiting our help site or filing a bug. Interested in switching channels? Find out how. You can submit feedback using ‘Report an issue’ under the wrench menu.

Danielle Drew
Google Chrome

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ISPs could have stopped massive click-fraud operation
In the wake of the massive DNSChanger click-fraud scam, security experts call on ISPs to do more
By Ted Samson | InfoWorld


In the wake of the successful bust of an alleged click-fraud operation that netted cyber criminals more than $14 million, security experts are bringing to light more information that could help organizations and end-users alike protect themselves from similar threats. Experts are also asking whether ISPs could and should have done more to protect Internet users from the attacks that had been going on for four years.

Dell SecureWorks, for example, has released a report explaining how perpetrators allegedly managed to infect upward of 4 million PCs worldwide with the DNSChanger Trojan that enabled them to rack up illicit profits for so long. The FBI, meanwhile, has provided detailed information as to how organizations and users can assess if their systems are infected. Finally, the Spamhaus Project has observed that ISPs could have acted early on to protect Internet users from the Rove Digital cyber crime gang activities.

Read more at :-
http://www.infoworld.com/t/web-security/isps-could...

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Is my computer safe from outside attack when it is in Sleep mode?
When a PC is 'sleeping' it does nothing, apart from the power keeping documents as they were. If firewalls and anti-virus software are in place, it is be safe
Computeractive staff PC help Desktops 15/11/2011


BT's Home Hub has a built-in firewall
Q I have a basic desktop computer running Windows XP. Can you advise me about the security of my computer if I use the Sleep mode instead of shutting down and switching it off at the mains?
For example, if my computer is in Sleep mode will my AVG anti-virus software and other updates still be downloaded onto the PC? I use BT’s broadband service via a Home Hub, which remains connected and powered at all times.
I am particularly concerned about someone gaining access to my internet banking details and passwords and so on.
Terry Jobling
A When a Windows computer is placed into Sleep mode, it essentially enters a low-power state in which it does nothing. In fact, pretty much all that happens is that power continues to be supplied to the PC’s memory, so that any programs or open documents are not forgotten and can be quickly displayed when the user commands the computer to wake from Sleep.
As such, the most direct answer to your question about updates is no – nothing will be downloaded when a Windows PC is in Sleep mode. This isn’t a problem, because such updates can (and typically do) happen in the background, when the PC is being used normally.
However, your secondary question raises some interesting security concerns that we think are worth addressing. Many modern computers (or rather, their network adapters) have a feature called ‘Wake on Lan’ or ‘WoL’ that enables someone to wake a PC remotely.


Read more: http://www.computeractive.co.uk/ca/pc-help/2112992...


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Expert Contributor 16th Nov, 2011 19:18
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Firefox 8.0.1 Available for Download It’s been a little over a week since Mozilla released the stable version for Firefox 8. Today they rolled out version 8.0.1 of the web browser. It is not yet available officially, but they already uploaded it to their servers.

There are no release notes accompanying it, but given that it is a minor build, we should expect security improvements and fixes for minor bugs.

However, the update is related to what Mozilla labeled as “explosive crashes”. The development team investigated over the weekend causes that would lead to the issue. They also worked on gathering information for blocklisting Roboform DLL.

“Explosive crashes” were also spotted before the release of Firefox 8.0 stable and at that time Mozilla blocked McAfee ScriptScan add-on, which caused the bad events; Norton was also involved and issued several compatibility updates.

http://news.softpedia.com/news/Firefox-8-0-1-Avail...

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Intel's 'Knights Corner' chip hits supercomputing speed
The processor, designed for high-performance apps, can run at 1 teraflop

By Patrick Thibodeau

Computerworld - SEATTLE -- Intel has produced a new chip that can operate at a sustained speed of one teraflop -- the type of supercomputing speed the U.S. government paid $55 million for 15 years ago. A teraflop is one trillion calculations per second.

This chip, called Knights Corner, was shown for the first time at the SC11 supercomputing conference here.

Intel isn't yet releasing all of the specs on the processor, including the amount of power it uses or its exact number of cores (it's more than 50). But the chip already has one large customer and a delivery date to make next year.

More at :-
http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9221870/Int...

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Microsoft: We won't update others' Windows apps
Missing a chance to make 'huge leap' in Windows security, argues expert

By Gregg Keizer

Computerworld - Microsoft on Tuesday slammed the door on updating third-party software via Windows Update in the upcoming Windows 8.

One security expert said the company was missing a big opportunity to improve the overall security of Windows PCs.

The new operating system will not update non-Microsoft software, said Farzana Rahman, the group program manager for Windows Update, in a blog post.

"The wide variety of delivery mechanisms, installation tools, and overall approaches to updates across the full breadth of applications makes it impossible to push all updates through [the Windows Update] mechanism," said Rahman. "As frustrating as this might be, it is also an important part of the ecosystem that we cannot just revisit for the installed base of software."

Rahman's statement was the clearest one ever made by Microsoft regarding the fact that it would not take other applications under its update wing.

More at :-
http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9221879/Mic...

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Last edited on 17th Nov, 2011 09:11
Chrome Stable Channel Update
Wednesday, November 16, 2011 | 15:05
Labels: Stable updates

The Stable channel has been updated to 15.0.874.121 for Windows, Mac, Linux and Chrome Frame platforms

All
Updated V8 - 3.5.10.24
This build contains the fix to a regression: SVG in iframe doesn't use specified dimensions (Issue: 98951)
Security fixes and rewards:
Please see the Chromium security page for more detail. Note that the referenced bugs may be kept private until a majority of our users are up to date with the fix.
[$1000] [103259] High CVE-2011-3900: Out-of-bounds write in v8. Credit to Christian Holler.
Full details about what changes have been made in this release are available in the SVN revisions log. Interested in switching to another channel? Find out how. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug.


Karen Grunberg
Google Chrome

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Expert Contributor 17th Nov, 2011 09:28
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November 17th, 2011, 08:01 GMT · By Eduard Kovacs
Romanian NASA Hacker Graduates From 'University of Weed'

Romanian hacker Robert Butyka, also known as Iceman, was apprehended by local law enforcement after being suspected of illegally accessing NASA servers by breaking the security measures set in place by the agency.

DIICOT, Romania's organized crime and anti-terrorism division, arrested 26-year-old Butyca in Cluj Napoca, his hometown, for 24 hours.

He is accused of accessing a network without authorization, disrupting a computing system by inserting, modifying and altering data, and illegally possessing the piece of software he had utilized to break into the systems owned by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) in December 12, 2010.

In the home of the one known in the online underground as Iceman, authorities found numerous computing devices which they took in for forensic analysis.

Local news reports that the suspect is unemployed and has no studies in the field of IT, his Facebook profile actually mentioning that he graduated from the 'University of Weed'. Since he couldn't have gained much from his attempt, the most plausible reason for the operation seems to be that he did it just to show he can.

More at :-
http://news.softpedia.com/news/Romanian-NASA-Hacke...

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Nearly a Fifth of Adult Population in UK Has Never Been Online

Written by
Ravi Mandalia

17 November, 2011uk online internet

Nearly one fifth of the adult population of UK has never accessed the Internet a recent report by Office of National Statistics (ONS) has claimed.

The collected by ONS showed that 17 percent UK adults have never used internet. The third quarter of 2011 data shows that 8.43 million out of the total adult population in UK never had been online, reported ITPro.

To increase these numbers Race Online 2012 is putting every effort to get as many persons as possible to use web by 2012.

ONS in their report mentioned that, "Internet use is linked to various socio-economic and demographic characteristics, such as age, disability, location and earnings". They also reported that adults over 65 years who are widowed or are people with disabilities are most likely never to use internet.



Read more: http://www.itproportal.com/2011/11/17/nearly-fifth...

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Expert Contributor 17th Nov, 2011 15:47
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12:47 GMT · By Eduard Kovacs
Zero-Day Vulnerability Causes BIND 9 Server Crash

Organizations worldwide began reporting their DNS servers that relied on BIND keep crashing while the nameservers were performing recursive queries.

The Internet System Consortium (ICS) claims that multiple versions were affected by an unidentified network event. Sophos names it a “denial of service vulnerability being exploited in-the-wild.”

“An as-yet unidentified network event caused BIND 9 resolvers to cache an invalid record, subsequent queries for which could crash the resolvers with an assertion failure,” states their description of the issue.

“ISC is working on determining the ultimate cause by which a record with this particular inconsistency is cached. At this time we are making available a patch which makes named recover gracefully from the inconsistency, preventing the abnormal exit.”

The patch consists of two components, one that prevents the cache from returning inconsistent data and one that makes sure that if an inconsistent answer is detected, prevents the crash of the name daemon.

“When a client query is handled, the code which processes the response to the client has to ask the cache for the records for the name that is being queried. The first component of the patch prevents the cache from returning the inconsistent data. The second component prevents named from crashing if it detects that it has been given an inconsistent answer of this nature.”

Due to the fact that there is no known workaround for the issue, customers are recommended to immediately upgrade the application.

The threat is serious since BIND is one of the most widely utilized pieces of DNS open source software that implements Domain Name System (DNS) protocols for the internet.

Read more at :-
http://news.softpedia.com/news/Zero-Day-Vulnerabil...

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Home Office considers new laws to combat cyber stalking
Public invited to contribute to review of Harassment Act
The Home Office is considering adding stalking, including cyber stalking to existing harassment laws.
It has set up a 12-week online consultation process and has asked the public, charities and victims to contribute their views on the problem.
Stalking and particularly cyber stalking is a growing problem. According to last year's British Crime survey, more than one million women and nearly the same number of men (900,000) are reported stalking incidents in the UK, so the government department has set up an online consultation.
The consultation will close on 5 February 2011
Read more at :-
http://www.computeractive.co.uk/ca/news/2125489/ho...

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Last edited on 17th Nov, 2011 16:35
By John Leyden •

Posted in Malware, 17th November 2011 14:12 GMT

Apple has updated its iTunes software to correct a security shortcoming that offered the potential for miscreants to mount man-in-the-middle attacks and appears to have played a central role in the infamous Ghost Click botnet scam.

iTunes 10.5.1, released on Monday, is a cross-platform update that addresses a flaw that's most acute on Windows systems. Prior to the update, hackers had the potential to intercept update queries between the iTunes client on a user's Windows machine and Apple. This might have been abused to offer a Trojaned version of iTunes, or – more likely and much easier to pull off – redirect surfers to a site punting fake anti-virus (AKA scareware) or running click-fraud scams.

The threat is most acute when Apple Software Update for Windows is not installed. In these cases, a user's default browser might be opened to a location under the control of hackers that poses as an Apple site.

Apple Software Update is included with OS X so the risk is a fair bit less for Mac fans. Nonetheless Mac users also need to update.

Fixing the flaw on both Mac and Windows machines involves enforcing updates via a secure connection, something that probably ought to have been applied as general good practice in the first place. Apple's advisory makes no mention if attacks based on the vulnerability had actually taken place but we're pretty sure this relates to the DNS Changer scam, which caused machines running Apple's Mac OS X, as well Windows PCs, to rely on rogue domain name system servers set up by hackers.

Read more at :-
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2011/11/17/itunes_upd...

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Expert Contributor 17th Nov, 2011 19:02
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More on......
The patch for a zero-day denial-of-service flaw in BIND
prevents crashes but doesn't fix the actual vulnerability
By Lucian Constantin | IDG News Service


The Internet Systems Consortium (ISC), an organization that maintains several software products critical for Internet infrastructure, has released a patch for an actively exploited denial-of-service vulnerability in the widely used BIND DNS server.

ISC launched an investigation into the issue Wednesday after many organizations around the world reported that their BIND 9-based DNS resolvers crashed unexpectedly. For example, judging by the comments posted in response to an Internet Storm Center alert, dozens of universities across the U.S. experienced the problem.

The DNS (Domain Name System) is used to translate domain names into IP (Internet Protocol) addresses, computers and network devices querying the defined DNS servers each time a website is accessed.

These DNS resolvers query other servers further up the chain in order to retrieve the correct answers. To speed up the process for future queries, the answers are cached locally for a period of time.

ISC determined that the crashes are the result of an inconsistent record being cached and then served to clients. It's not yet clear what kind of network event causes the BIND resolvers to cache the malformed record in the first place.

It could be either a deliberate attack or an unintended anomaly, but according to Carsten Eiram, chief security specialist at vulnerabilty research company Secunia, the first scenario is more likely. "Based on the public reports and information we've received, it seems to be caused by malicious attacks," he said.


http://www.infoworld.com/d/security/isc-patches-bi...

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Expert Contributor 18th Nov, 2011 21:40
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Mozilla makes progress on Firefox silent updates
Every-six-week release schedule leaves more users running older versions

By Gregg Keizer
November 18, 2011 12:58 PM ET
Computerworld - Mozilla is making progress on adding a silent update mechanism to Firefox, with plans to integrate the new service in Firefox 10 early next year.

But one of the developers working on the feature cautioned that silent update might slip.

"At this point, we're not quite sure which version of Firefox this will land in.... We're working to land it as soon as is safely possible," Ehsan Akhgari, a Firefox engineer in charge of one of the silent update components, said in a blog post last weekend.

Akhgari's part of the project is to minimize the amount of time it takes Firefox to launch after downloading an update.

To do so, he's come up with a way to stage the downloaded update -- essentially an updated copy of Firefox -- in a separate Windows directory, then swap the older edition with the newer one the next time the user starts up Firefox.

Read more at :-
http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9222011/Moz...

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Expert Contributor 18th Nov, 2011 21:50
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If you're interested in testing the next version of Microsoft Security Essentials, head over to the Microsoft Connect site. The location of the signup site leaked yesterday, when Microsoft began sending email invitations to previous beta testers who had tested Microsoft Security Essentials version 2, which shipped last December.
NOVEMBER 18, 2011
Leaked email reveals Microsoft Security Essentials beta program
If you'd like to test the next version of Microsoft Security Essentials, sign up now -- in case Microsoft withdraws the offer
By signing in with your Live ID and venturing to the page, you should be added to the beta list. If you're interested, do it now, just in case Microsoft withdraws the offer.

The Web page itself won't tell you anything of interest, beyond "Thank you for participating in the Microsoft Security Essentials Beta program, which will start soon." But here's what the leaked email said:

Thank you so much for being a part of the Microsoft Security Essentials v2 Beta.

You have indicated that you are interested in receiving invites for Connect programs from Microsoft, so we would like to invite you to participate in the Microsoft Security Essentials Public Beta program on Microsoft Connect.

This program is for the newest Beta version of Microsoft Security Essentials which has the latest protection features. Be one of the select few who get access to this Beta release by signing up now to reserve your spot!

Read more at :-
http://www.infoworld.com/t/anti-virus/leaked-email...

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Expert Contributor 18th Nov, 2011 21:55
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Chrome Dev Channel Update
Thursday, November 17, 2011 | 16:12
Labels: Dev updates

The Dev channel has been updated to 17.0.942.0 for Windows, Mac, Linux, and Chrome Frame. This build contains the following updates:

All
Updated V8 - 3.7.7.0.
Fixed New Tab page apps re-ordering issue.
Policy support for disabling the Cloud Print Connector has been added.
Windows
Fixed an issue where Chrome app windows would hang. [r110239]
Known Issues
Crash when notification occurs [Issue: 103427]
Full details about what changes are in this build are available in the SVN revision log. Interested in switching release channels? Find out how. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug.

Dharani Govindan
Google Chrome
14 comments | Links to this post | Email Post

Stable Channel Update for Chromebooks
| 15:36
Labels: Chrome OS, Stable updates
The Stable channel has been updated to 15.0.874.121 (Platform version: 1011.137) for Chromebooks (Acer AC700, Samsung Series 5, and Cr-48).

Highlights:
New flash
Security fixes
Stability fixes
If you find new issues, please let us know by visiting our help site or filing a bug. You can also submit feedback using "Report an issue" under the wrench icon. Interested in switching to the Dev channel? Find out how.

Josafat Garcia
Google Chrome

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Expert Contributor 18th Nov, 2011 22:11
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November 18th, 2011, 14:10 GMT · By Lucian Parfeni
Google Chrome Overtakes Firefox to Become the No. 2 Browser in the World

Google has finally done it, its Chrome browser is now the second most popular in the world, topped only by Internet Explorer. According to the latest StatCounter numbers, Chrome has just edged past Firefox, last week, taking the number two spot.

The most interesting part is that Chrome actually lost a bit of market share coming from the previous week; however, Firefox lost even more in that time.

In fact, the only major browser to add market share in the past week is Internet Explorer, in a reversal of a very old trend.

http://news.softpedia.com/news/Google-Chrome-Overt...

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Expert Contributor 18th Nov, 2011 22:39
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DevilRobber Trojan Gets New Disguise

The new version is being distributed as the image-editing program PixelMator.


F-Secure researchers recently uncovered a new variant of the DevilRobber Trojan.

"The original DevilRobber was being distributed in pirated versions of the popular program Graphic Converter, and in similar form the malware developers are targeting additional graphics tools by releasing this new version disguised as the popular image-editing program PixelMator," writes CNET News' Topher Kessler.

"Unlike the original version of the malware that ran embedded in full versions of Graphic Converter, the new version contains none of the legitimate PixelMator code and instead is only disguised as the program," Kessler writes. "When run, the fake PixelMator program acts as a basic downloader that will contact some FTP servers and download and install the malware."

Go to "DevilRobber Trojan now disguised as PixelMator" to read the details.

http://www.esecurityplanet.com/malware/devilrobber...

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Expert Contributor 19th Nov, 2011 09:08
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French official: Europe must defend privacy rights
November 18, 2011 By JAMEY KEATEN , Associated Press
(AP) -- Europe and the United States don't agree on how to strike the right balance between protecting privacy rights and battling the terror threat, the head of France's data protection watchdog said Friday.

Isabelle Falque-Pierrotin said the EU Justice Commissioner, Viviane Reding, should defend data privacy rights amid "strong" pressure from U.S. officials to get access information about European citizens for security reasons.
"In my view, notably in the international sphere and in talks with the United States, the balance between data protection and security is very strained," Falque-Pierrotin told The Associated Press in an interview.
European authorities "understand" America's concerns about terrorism in the wake of the 9/11 terror attacks, she said. But Europe "is trying to negotiate to make sure that data and Internet privacy is respected. On that matter, we're not totally aligned."
The EU said Thursday it had signed an accord with the United States over air-passenger data for flights from Europe to America that will limit what information U.S. officials can use and will improve data protection. The agreement replaces one in 2007 that the European Parliament criticized for having given U.S. authorities too much authority to view the private data of EU citizens

More at :-
http://www.physorg.com/news/2011-11-french-europe-...

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Expert Contributor 19th Nov, 2011 09:11
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Norway hit by major data-theft attack
November 17, 2011
(AP) -- Data from Norway's oil and defense industries may have been stolen in what is feared to be one of the most extensive data espionage cases in the country's history, security officials said Thursday.

Industrial secrets from companies were stolen and "sent out digitally from the country," the Norwegian National Security Authority said, though it did not name any companies or institutions that were targeted.
At least 10 different attacks, mostly aimed at the oil, gas, energy and defense industries, were discovered in the past year, but the agency said it has to assume the number is much higher because many victims have yet to realize that their computers have been hacked.
"This is the first time Norway has unveiled such an extensive and widespread espionage attack," it said.
Spokesman Kjetil Berg Veire added it is likely that more than one person is behind the attacks.
The methods varied, but in some cases individually crafted e-mails that, armed with viruses, would sweep recipients' entire hard-drives for data and steal passwords, documents and confidential documents.
The agency said in a statement that this type of data-theft was "cost-efficient" for foreign intelligence services and that "espionage over the Internet is cheap, provides good results and is low-risk." Veire would not elaborate, but said it was not clear who was behind the attacks.

More at :-
http://www.physorg.com/news/2011-11-norway-major-d...

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Expert Contributor 19th Nov, 2011 09:16
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SCADA hack blamed for breach at US water plant
by Shaun Nichols

19 Nov 2011

The remote breach of a SCADA controller unit has been credited with causing the partial shutdown at a US water processing plant, causing experts to once again question the security of vital infrastructure.
Authorities say an attacker was able to obtain login credentials and access a SCADA controller which managed a water pump in Illinois. The credentials are believed to have been obtained through a breach at a firm which develops controller software for the device.

More at :-
http://www.v3.co.uk/v3-uk/news/2126382/scada-hack-...

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Expert Contributor 19th Nov, 2011 09:20
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Facebook Accounts May Be More Valuable Than Credit Cards

Security experts predict that next year the industry will face a lot of new challenges, many of the things that until now have not been considered so important, will affect regular users and organizations worldwide.

Websense Security Labs released their predictions for 2012 concerning the threats that will target individuals and companies.

One of the most frightening things refers to the increase in value of social media accounts, which will be sold like warm bred in underground forums, since by possessing these accounts, crooks can manipulate the victim's friends and thus acquiring even more targets.

The advanced persistent attacks (APT) of 2012 are expected to rely on this since operations that make use of social media chat functionality are not uncommon, but they're estimated to become main attack vectors for APTs, along with mobile and cloud exploits.

Another prediction refers to the fact that social engineering, one of the most popular methods used by hackers in their operations, will rely more on new mobile features such as location-based services.

More at :-
http://news.softpedia.com/news/Facebook-Accounts-M...

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mogs RE: Daily CYBERCLIPS November
Expert Contributor 19th Nov, 2011 09:52
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General observation from Mogs

Regardless of nationality..........
Banks do not burn fingers :
Cybercriminality and spy-where(?), fear not to " write" ?
I must have made a few internet friends with my language ?
Very often I get sore eyes.......
Who's with the Zombies ?!
International colaberation or warfare ?! Sometimes I still manage poetic !
It doesn't look like a battlefield ?!!
Save the internet for the children ?


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Expert Contributor 19th Nov, 2011 16:43
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November 19th, 2011, 12:12 GMT · By Ionut IlascuBLOG
Firefox 8.0.1 Deleted from Mozilla Servers There is a reason Mozilla announces the release of a product days after uploading it to their servers. And that reason is that testing is still performed and that finding a serious issue would force the company from shipping the product to end-users (these can be viewed as release candidates).

And this is exactly what happened in the case of Firefox 8.0.1. The build was available for download from Mozilla’s FTP up until today, when it was deleted because of RoboForm-related issues.

One of the problems the development team was working in order to ready a Firefox 8.1.0 update was gathering information for blocklisting RoboForm DLL. It looks like trouble ran much deeper than that and a second build is now required.

You can still download the initial Firefox 8.0.1 release and it should not cause any trouble as long as you don’t mix RoboForm in.

http://news.softpedia.com/news/Firefox-8-0-1-Delet...

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Expert Contributor 19th Nov, 2011 16:59
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Malware loves Windows Task Scheduler
More malware is using Windows Task Scheduler to do its dirty work. Here's how to mitigate this surprising attack vector
Malware authors have been using the Windows Task Scheduler (or AT.exe jobs) to victimize hosts for at least a decade, but the Stuxnet worm seems to have ushered in a renaissance. Recent Zlob variants have made frequent use of Task Scheduler; the widespread click-fraud Trojan Bamital drew on Task Scheduler as well.

Stuxnet exploited Task Scheduler in a way that was previously unknown -- it was a true zero-day attack. But malware doesn't have to get too fancy to put Task Scheduler to ill use. For example, malware will often create a task that looks for certain preconditions to launch, downloads new malicious code on a schedule, or uses scheduled tasks as a way to always remain in memory. I've seen malware hunters struggle to find out how the malicious code "keeps re-infecting their clean system." Answer: Check the Task Scheduler.


Unfortunately, I'm finding more and more examples of new malware and even APT-style attacks that are abusing Task Scheduler and AT.exe, and they are being sneaky about it. Now is a good time for all of us to check the Task Scheduler.

More at :-
http://www.infoworld.com/t/malware/malware-loves-w...

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Expert Contributor 19th Nov, 2011 17:53
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WebP Could Help Chrome Grow Even Faster Chrome is already regarded as one of the fastest growing web browsers on the market, both in market share and browsing speed. As far as the plans for the latter, things go beyond improvements in the JavaScript engine, V8, and tackle content compression, namely images.

Up until recently, Google’s WebP format featured lossy image compression. But the development team managed to achieve lossless compression and support for transparency. Placing this detail into the browser speed equation, Chrome should become even faster, as the same image quality can be delivered with less impact on the bandwidth (check out the side by side comparison).

This also aligns with browsing enhancements in the smartphone segment, as users would be able to navigate more and faster at the same bandwidth cost.

However, encoding/decoding process has not been optimized for processing speed at the moment, and it may take quite a while to witness a shift in web developers’ choice of images.
http://news.softpedia.com/news/WebP-Could-Help-Chr...

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Expert Contributor 20th Nov, 2011 17:08
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Backdoor Trojan Being Distributed via Facebook

A variety of messages lead to fake YouTube pages, where victims are tricked into downloading malware.
Microsoft is warning of a new social engineering campaign aimed at tricking users into installing a backdoor Trojan.

"The messages used to lure in users vary, but they all lead to fake YouTube pages," writes Help Net Security's Zeljka Zorz. "Once there, the user is urged to download a new version of 'Video Embed ActiveX Object' in order to play the video file."

"Unfortunately, the offered setup.exe file is the Caphaw Trojan, which bypasses firewalls, installs an FTP and a proxy server and a keylogger on the affected machine," Zorz writes.

Go to "Backdoor Trojan pushed via versatile Facebook campaign" to read the details.

http://www.esecurityplanet.com/malware/backdoor-tr...

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Expert Contributor 20th Nov, 2011 17:10
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Rails Security Updates Patch XSS Vulnerability

The flaw could allow an attacker to insert arbitrary code into a page.

Ruby on Rails has been updated to patch a security flaw.

"According to the developers, a cross-site scripting (XSS) vulnerability in the helper method for i18n translations could be exploited by an attacker to insert arbitrary code into a page," The H Security reports.

"Rails 3.0.0 and later, as well as 2.3.x in combination with the rails_xss plug-in, are affected," the article states.

Go to "Rails updates close XSS hole" to read the details.

http://www.esecurityplanet.com/patches/rails-secur...

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Expert Contributor 21st Nov, 2011 08:35
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Last edited on 21st Nov, 2011 08:43
New malware variants are set to surpass 75 million by the end of the year, according to McAfee.
The company said in its quarterly threat report that the volume of new samples is surpassing its early estimates and forcing the company to raise its forecast.

Toralv Dirro, McAfee Labs EMEA security strategist told V3 that the growth in new malware is largely due to the rise in crimeware toolkits. With criminals increasingly using automated tools to generate malware, the level of unique samples is climbing higher than ever.
"Most of it is a handful of trojan kits," Dirro explained, "there are not as many people trying to write that trojan up from scratch."
Also helping to drive malware levels is an increasing interest in the mobile space. The company found that malware writers are increasingly targeting Android handsets with premium number diallers and other mobile-focused infections.

Read more at :-
http://www.v3.co.uk/v3-uk/news/2126384/malware-loa...

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Expert Contributor 21st Nov, 2011 09:00
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123456: The Worst Passwords of 2011
By Jared Newman, PCWorld

Internet users never learn. No matter how many times we hear about obvious, hackable passwords, people keep using them. And the situation doesn't seem to be getting better.

Below is a list of the 25 worst passwords of 2011, compiled by SplashData. The security software developer generated the list from millions of actual stolen passwords, posted online by hackers. Not surprisingly, the most common passwords are also the worst, including "password," "123456" and "qwerty." Even passwords that seem kind of unique, like "trustno1" and "shadow" are actually quite common. And why does "monkey" always show up on these lists?

More at :-
http://www.pcworld.com/article/244288/123456_the_w...

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Expert Contributor 21st Nov, 2011 09:04
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Prolexic: 1.4 Days Is the Average Duration of a Cyberattack

The third quarter report released by Prolexic reveals some interesting details about the tactics, average duration, origin countries and the volumes of cyberattacks that took place in the past period.

Figures show that most hits were actually SYN floods (24%), closely followed by ICMP floods (22%) and UD floods (19%), indicating a considerable rise in numbers and a change in tactics.

“First and foremost, I think the nature of DDoS attacks are changing.Attackers know most businesses have some level of DDoS protection and they are now starting to directly target DDoS mitigation equipment, most of which do not have the capacity to process the high packet per second attacks that are being used,” said Paul Sop, chief technology officer at Prolexic.

Most attacks turn out to be network layer attacks, at the other end of the stick being operations that targeted the application layer (17%).

While some people might think that hacks are an in-and-out job, in reality, an average attack lasts for 1.4 days, 1.5Gbps being the average speed of mitigated traffic during such a hit.

Like we've seen in previous reports, China is still the leader when it comes to countries from where attacks originate, the eastern country being responsible for 55% of all the hits. India and Turkey complete the podium.

More at :-
http://news.softpedia.com/news/Prolexic-1-4-Days-I...

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Expert Contributor 21st Nov, 2011 21:42
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Despite controversy, cybercrime treaty endures

By Jeremy Kirk
November 21, 2011 11:51 AM ET
IDG News Service - Delegates from around the world are meeting in France this week to discuss the only international treaty dealing with cybercrime, a treaty that has come under fire from some countries but defended by others as a crucial tool in fighting electronic crime.

Wednesday marks the 10th anniversary of the Convention on Cybercrime, also known as the Budapest Convention. The treaty, which was opened for signatures in November 2001, sets guidelines for laws and procedures for dealing with Internet crime.

The treaty has formed a foundation for global law enforcement of cyberspace, requiring countries who abide by it to have uniform anti-cybercrime laws and law enforcement contacts available around the clock, among other requirements.

The Convention is overseen by the Council of Europe, an organization founded in 1949 that also oversees the European Convention on Human Rights.

Council of Europe member countries can sign the treaty, and once their national laws conform with the treaty, their national legislatures can ratify it. Countries outside the council are invited to accede to the treaty.

More at :-
http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9222063/Des...

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Expert Contributor 21st Nov, 2011 21:48
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OpenPGP JavaScript implementation allows Webmail encryption
German company releases OpenPGP Chrome extension to facilitate Webmail encryption
By Lucian Constantin | IDG News Service

Researchers from German security firm Recurity Labs have released a JavaScript implementation of the OpenPGP specification that allows users to encrypt and decrypt Webmail messages.

Called GPG4Browsers, the tool functions as an extension for Google Chrome and now is capable of working with Gmail.

According to its developers, GPG4Browsers is a prototype, but it supports almost all asymmetric and symmetric ciphers and hash functions specified in the OpenPGP standard.

The OpenPGP specification uses public key cryptography to encrypt and digitally sign messages and other data. It is based on the original PGP (Pretty Good Privacy) program and is most commonly used for securing email communications.

Read more at :-
http://www.infoworld.com/d/security/openpgp-javasc...

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Expert Contributor 22nd Nov, 2011 08:51
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Boost in IPv6 use is only one step to solution

By Stephen Lawson
IDG News Service - Support for IPv6 has grown by almost 20 times in the past year by one measure, but most websites still can't be reached without IPv4, the current Internet Protocol, which is near running out of unclaimed addresses.

The number of subdomains under .com, .net and .org that support Internet Protocol version 6 increased by about 1,900 percent in the year leading up to October 2011, according to an automated sampling of subdomains by Measurement Factory. The study, which was sponsored by IPv6 software specialist InfoBlox, used a script to automatically sample 1 percent of the subdomains under the three well-known top-level domains.

IPv4 only allows for about 4 billion addresses, whereas IPv6 has a nearly unlimited supply. ICANN (Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers), the global governing body for the Internet, assigned the last of the unclaimed IPv4 addresses to regional registry bodies earlier this year. Some enterprises and service providers are making a gradual transition to IPv6 using dual software stacks, but experts expect users eventually to come to the Internet without IPv4 addresses. They will need pure IPv6 communication, which most operators of websites can't offer today.

More at :-
http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9222082/Boo...

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Expert Contributor 22nd Nov, 2011 19:22
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EFF proposes new method to strengthen Public Key Infrastructure
'Sovereign Keys' specification is designed to provide an additional layer of security between domain names and their certificates
By Lucian Constantin | IDG News Service

The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) is proposing an extension to the current SSL chain of trust that aims to improve the security of HTTPS and other secure communication protocols.

EFF's "Sovereign Keys" (SK) specification is designed to put the control give domain owners control over the link between their domain names and their certificates after recent Certificate Authority (CA) compromises raised serious questions about the security of the entire Internet Public Key Infrastructure (PKI).

One of the main problems with the current PKI model is the lack of control over CAs and their subsidiaries. There are literally hundreds of organizations spread around the world that are allowed to issue certificates for any domain name and some of them are operated by governments that practice Internet surveillance and censorship.

More at :-
http://www.infoworld.com/d/networking/eff-proposes...

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Expert Contributor 22nd Nov, 2011 19:28
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Report: Cyber fraud hits thousands of Xbox gamers

A plethora of Xbox Live gamers have reportedly been duped into handing over their account logins.
By Tom Brewster, 22 Nov 2011 at 12:32

Thousands of Xbox Live gamers have been fooled by fraudsters to hand over their account details, in what appears to be a widespread phishing campaign.

In the UK, gamers had lost an average of £100 and in some cases had been robbed of over £200, The Sun reported.

In one case, emails were sent to players linking to a website purportedly offering free Microsoft points to buy games with. They were then prompted to enter their login details.

The criminals used stolen details to access accounts to both acquire funds and gain info on other Xbox Live gamers for further social engineering.

Gamers only became aware of the account hijacking when they were locked out.

More at :-
http://www.itpro.co.uk/637495/report-cyber-fraud-h...

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Expert Contributor 22nd Nov, 2011 19:33
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Gamekeeper turned poacher

By John Leyden

Posted in Malware, 22nd November 2011 14:14 GMT

A law enforcement Trojan takes advantage of the same recently patched iTunes flaw also used by Ghost Click botnet, according to a demo at a recent German trade show.

Spiegel Online reports that a promo video for a variant of the FinFisher spyware application shows it exploits a vulnerability in iTunes to update the software on targeted systems. Prior to a recent update, iTunes used an unencrypted HTTP request to poll for the latest version of Apple's media player software. This technique created an opening for man-in-the-middle attacks, providing Apple Software Updater is not in play*.

Instead of receiving the URL for the latest version of the iTunes from Apple, an attacker could send a dummy update request that induces victims to visit a counterfeit webpage under the control of attackers.

For the redirection to work, a machine would already need to be infected with the DNSChanger software (in the case of the alleged Ghost Click botnet operators) or in the case of law enforcement agencies using Gamma's FinFly ISP technology, you'd need ISPs to be in on the redirection ruse.

FinFisher is marketed by Gamma International to cops and spooks as a means to tap the Skype calls, IM chats and emails of suspected criminals. Documents found during the ransacking of Egypt's secret police headquarters, at the height of the Arab Spring uprising, suggest that the Mubarak regime purchased FinFisher to spy on dissidents. Gamma International, which denies selling its wares to Egypt, ran a stall at the Cyberwarfare Europe conference in Berlin back in September. Delegates to the conference included government and business representatives from the United Arab Emirates, Indonesia and Malaysia.

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2011/11/22/trojan_exp...

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Expert Contributor 22nd Nov, 2011 19:40
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SeaMonkey 2.5 has been released. Users that like their browser brimming with features plus the kitchen sink should rejoice. Based on the relatively recent Firefox 8, which has already been updated to Firefox 8.0.1, SeaMonkey 2.5 doesn't really bring anything new in terms of specific features.

The big new things in SeaMonkey 2.5 come straight from Firefox. These include a new checker for add-ons installed by third-party software, which now get blocked at startup unless the user specifically chooses to continue to use them.

SeaMonkey 2.5 also brings better support for HTML5, in particular the video and audio support. Firefox 8's launch details should be a good guide to what's new in SeaMonkey.

As for specific SeaMonkey updates, there are only some minor bug fixes and patches. You can get the full list in the changelog.

SeaMonkey 2.5 is available for Windows, Mac and Linux.

http://news.softpedia.com/news/SeaMonkey-2-5-Based...

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Expert Contributor 23rd Nov, 2011 08:20
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Chromebook Updates
Beta Channel Update for Chromebooks
Tuesday, November 22, 2011 | 13:03
Labels: Beta updates, Chrome OS

The Google Chrome team is happy to announce the release of Chrome 16 on the Beta Channel for Chromebooks (Acer AC700, Samsung Series 5, and Cr-48).

Chrome version 16.0.912.44 (Platform version: 1193.65.0)

Release highlights:
Update Pepper Flash
New 3-part version numbering format for Chrome OS. As always, please include the Chrome version as well as the Chrome OS version in any issues you file.
Cisco L2TP over IPSec is now supported
The Entd Enterprise extension is no longer used
Numerous stability & security fixes
Known issues:
22372 - Renderer crash
19788 - Sync is disabled after any crash
20511 - Two finger scrolling does not always work smoothly (all Chromebook platforms)
22263 - Copy & Paste creates file with different permissions than regular download flow
22268 - May encounter connection error on first sign-in with 2-factor sign-in enabled
23147 - Signing in with custom encryption password may request password several times. Workaround: Go to the Settings menu by going to chrome://settings/syncSetup
If you find new issues, please let us know by visiting our help site or filing a bug. Interested in switching channels? Find out how. You can submit feedback using ‘Report an issue’ under the wrench menu.

Danielle Drew
Google Chrome
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Dev Channel Update for Chromebooks
Monday, November 21, 2011 | 14:00
Labels: Chrome OS, Dev updates

The Dev channel has been updated to 17.0.942.0 (Platform version: 1324.0.0) for Chromebooks (Acer AC700, Samsung Series 5, and Cr-48).

Highlights:
Updated Chrome version
Update Adobe Flash to 11.0.1.152
Known issues:
Issue 22949: Repositioning of bookmarks results is in bookmark duplicate
Issue 22950: Chrome crashes when uploading picture to picasa album

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Expert Contributor 23rd Nov, 2011 08:28
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Microsoft claims significantly reduced Windows 8 installation times

Should make the annual reinstall go by a little quicker
By Lawrence Latif
Tue Nov 22 2011, 13:41

SOFTWARE CHURN ARTIST Microsoft claims to have slashed installation times for Windows 8.
Christa St. Pierre, part of Microsoft's Setup and Deployment Team claimed the firm has managed to trim significant fat from Windows 8's installation procedure, requiring fewer clicks and shorter install time. According to St. Pierre, a clean install of Windows 8 should take just 21 minutes, compared to 32 minutes for Windows 7.
Microsoft is particularly proud of the speed-up it claims to have achieved when users migrate applications and data from previous installations. In this area St. Pierre admitted Windows 7 wasn't particularly good, saying, "If you had a large number of files on your system, you may have seen that installation times in Windows 7 didn't scale very well."

More at :-
http://www.theinquirer.net/inquirer/news/2126868/m...

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Expert Contributor 23rd Nov, 2011 08:33
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Google mail crypto tweak makes eavesdropping harder

'Forward secrecy' protects data for the long term

By Dan Goodin in San Francisco •

Posted in Enterprise Security, 22nd November 2011 21:31 GMT

Google engineers have enhanced the encryption offered in Gmail, Google Docs, and other services to protect users against retroactive attacks that allow hackers to decrypt communications months or years after they were sent.

The feature, a type of key-establishment protocol known as forward secrecy, ensures that each online session is encrypted with a different public key and that corresponding private keys are never kept in long-term storage. That, in essence, means there's no master key that unlocks multiple sessions that may span months or years. Attackers who recover a key will be able to decrypt communications exchanged only during a single session.

Google security guru Adam Langley said his team built the feature into Google's default SSL protection using a preferred cipher suite that's based on elliptic curve cryptography and the Diffie-Hellman key-exchange method. They have released their code as an addition to the OpenSSL library to reduce the work necessary for other websites to implement the protection.

“We would very much like to see forward secrecy become the norm and hope that our deployment serves as a demonstration of the practicality of that vision,” Langley wrote in a blog post published on Tuesday.

More at :-
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2011/11/22/google_per...

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Expert Contributor 23rd Nov, 2011 08:38
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Mozilla has released its first bug-fixing update to the latest Firefox 8. The new Firefox 8.0.1 fixes two main bugs and possibly some more minor issues. A pre-release build Firefox 8.0.1 had previously been pushed to the Mozilla FTP servers.

It was later pulled, probably because it failed Mozilla's quality assurance tests. But Firefox 8.0.1 has now been officially released and it's safe to grab and install it. If you're already running Firefox 8, you should be getting an updated soon.

Firefox 8.0.1 fixes a bug that affected the Mac OS X version. In some cases, loading a Java Applet via the Java SE 6 1.6.0_29 would lead to a crash.

The new Firefox also fixes a startup crash bug that affected Windows users running RoboForm versions older than 7.6.2.

Firefox 8.0.1 is available for Windows, Mac and Linux.

http://news.softpedia.com/news/Firefox-8-0-1-Offic...

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Expert Contributor 23rd Nov, 2011 09:01
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'Occupy Flash' manifesto calls for end to Adobe plug-in

The group claims that HTML 5 has won the fight for the future of web browsing

Computer users are being urged to uninstall the Flash Player plug-in by a group of US developers.

The Occupy Flash movement claims the software is buggy, crashes a lot and requires constant security updates.

Adobe recently cancelled development of its Flash plug-in for mobile devices, saying that the alternative HTML 5 offered "the best solution".

However, the firm says its software still offers a superior experience on desktop PCs.

The movement's founders said they had all coded for Flash at some point in their careers and had never worked for one of Adobe's competitors.

They said they were inspired by the other Occupy movements.

More at :-
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-15797399

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Expert Contributor 23rd Nov, 2011 19:36
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Firefox's proposed silent updates carry a security risk
Silent updating may be more convenient to consumers, but it will also invite hacker exploitation of the process, a security expert warns
By John P. Mello Jr. | PC World

As a way to speed up the process of updating Firefox, Mozilla engineers are mulling over a silent update feature, which one security expert argues is a bad idea.

Currently, when Firefox detects an available update, it lets you know and if you agree to install it, the browser launches its updater program. That program downloads the update, applies it to Firefox, and restarts the browser. While all that is happening, you're twiddling your thumbs watching a progress bar on your computer screen.

To skirt the lag time in the current updating process, the Firefox team is considering a "silent" alternative. Instead of performing an update in the foreground, updates would be downloaded in the background and installed on a copy of the browser in a new directory. The first time that you launch Firefox after an update has been completed, your old version of Firefox is swapped out for the new version. "In this scenario, you likely won’t notice that Firefox has applied an update as no UI is shown," Firefox Engineer Ehsan Akhgari recently wrote in a Mozilla blog.

"Now, the reason that this approach fixes the problem is that swapping the directories, unlike the actual process of applying the update, is really fast," he added.

Fast but dangerous?
It may also be really dangerous, according to Philip Lieberman, the founder and president of Lieberman Software, a maker of password management solutions located in Los Angeles.

Read more at :-
http://www.infoworld.com/d/security/firefoxs-propo...

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Expert Contributor 24th Nov, 2011 11:35
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Brower plug-ins, social networks, HTML iframes top Q3 security threats

WEB BROWSER plug-ins and extensions, social networking web sites, HTML iframes, blackhat SEO and phishing attacks are some of the most dominant security threats encountered in the third quarter of this year, according to the latest State of the Web report by Zscaler Threatlabz.
Internet Explorer (IE) remains the most used web browser at 58 per cent, with the vast majority of people still using old versions of the Microsoft software. Only 1.68 per cent of people use IE 9.x, 28.23 per cent use IE 8.x, 22.02 per cent use IE 7.x, and 4.21 per cent still use the significantly outdated and vulnerable IE 6.x.
Modern web browsers have their own threats, however, with the ever useful plug-ins and extensions presenting particularly big risks. Adobe Flash is the most used browser plug-in, followed by Windows Media Player, Adobe Reader, Outlook and .NET.
The problem with these is that, as with the web browsers themselves, people tend not to update them, and older plugins and extensions usually have some big security vulnerabilities. Threatlabz found that Adobe Shockwave was the most outdated plugin in the third quarter, followed by Java and Adobe Reader, all of which have known security risks if not updated.
According to Threatlabz' research most people aren't even aware of what plug-ins they have installed, and knowledge and awareness is a key part of online security.
Regardless of what web browser or plug-ins you are using, chances are you will have some access to a social networking web site, be it Facebook, Twitter or Google+. Threatlabz found that these web sites make up the vast majority of web applications and place users in extreme vulnerability to click-jacking and phishing attacks.
Malicious HTML iframes came in first in the top 10 families of malware detected by antivirus programs. Javascript redirectors were second, followed by fake malware detection, malicious Flash code, online games malware, PDF Javascript threats, Javascript iframes, spyware toolbars, W32 trojans, and finally Javascript shellcode.
Blackhat search engine optimisation is also high on the list of tactics used by cyber criminals to artificially boost their web site traffic, which can help infect more computers and bring in more ill-gotten funds. Malware-infected search results were down compared to the second quarter, but there were more fake or hijacked web sites, particularly using the .edu domain extension. µ

http://www.theinquirer.net/inquirer/news/2127382/b...

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Expert Contributor 24th Nov, 2011 14:09
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November 24th, 2011, 12:22 GMT · By Eduard Kovacs
Bitdefender Reinvents 'Idle' Scanning (Exclusive)

With the release of Bitdefender Antivirus Free Edition, the experts behind the project not only integrated new technologies, but they also considerably improved some existing ones.

In a recent interview I had with Alex Balan, senior product manager at Bitdefender, he revealed something interesting about the free product and how it scans a system without any impact on its resources.

“Normally, idle scanning means that when the application finds CPU resources, it steps in and scans the system. With Bitdefender Antivirus Free Edition we not only took the concept to another level but we reinvented it all together,” he said.

This new concept begins at the point where the application is being installed and to make sure the regular operations performed by the user are not affected in any way, a calibration library steps in and measures the device's performance.

“Upon installation, a calibration library checks the CPU and hard disk performance in order to align the algorithms fine-tuning the impact in system performance with the overall system performance. Basically this ensures that whenever needed, Autoscan can run in background while heavy-duty tasks (gaming, for instance) are being performed in the foreground, without interfering with their performance,” Balan revealed.

He supplied a specific scenario where an application is started on two different computers that share the exact same resources.

By utilizing the time frames in which the application doesn't use up all the computational resources, a scanning thread manages to scan somewhere around two files, at the same time making sure that the program boots up just as fast as it would without the scan taking place.

This might not seem much, but the whole idea is that Bitdefender Antivirus Free Edition goes into action only when it is completely certain that there is no impact on the user-performed tasks.

In other words, customers can rest assured that even if they don't feel that the antivirus is working, it actually is.

http://news.softpedia.com/news/Bitdefender-Reinven...

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Expert Contributor 24th Nov, 2011 16:14
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Largest DDoS attack so far this year peaked at 45Gbps, says company
Up to 250,000 compromised computers attacked an Asian e-commerce vendor over a seven-day period, according to Prolexic

By Lucian Constantin

IDG News Service - A week-long DDoS attack that launched a flood of traffic at an Asian e-commerce company in early November was the biggest such incident so far this year, according to Prolexic, a company that defends websites against such attacks.

The distributed denial-of-service attack consisted of four consecutive waves launched from multiple botnets between Nov. 5 and Nov. 12, 2011, Prolexic said.

It estimated that up to 250,000 computers infected with malware participated in the attack, many of them in China.

At the height of the attack, those computers made 15,000 connections per second to the target company's e-commerce platform, swamping it with up to 45Gbps of traffic, Prolexic said. It declined to name the company, one of its clients, citing a confidentiality agreement.

More to read at :-
http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9222156/Lar...

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Expert Contributor 25th Nov, 2011 02:31
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Black Friday iTunes infected credit malware alert

Security experts say the infected email offers users credit for iTunes music, games and video
Criminals are targeting internet users with a new gift certificate scam, according to security experts.

Users receive an email that claims to be from Apple's iTunes store, warns the Eleven security blog.

The ZIP file attached contains malware that may allow hackers to gain access to the recipient's computer.

The blog says the attack appears to have been timed to coincide with Black Friday, one of the US's busiest shopping days.

Black Friday was the name used by Philadelphia's police department in the 1960s to describe the day after Thanksgiving because of all the traffic jams caused by people visiting the city's stores.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-15881034

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Expert Contributor 25th Nov, 2011 02:40
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Last edited on 25th Nov, 2011 02:41
European Court of Justice rejects web piracy filter

Blocking general access to peer-to-peer sites was ruled to be in breach of EU laws
The European Court of Justice has ruled that content owners cannot ask ISPs to filter out illegal content.

The ruling could have implications for the creative industries as they attempt to crack down on piracy.

The court said that while content providers can ask ISPs to block specific sites, wider filtering was in breach of the E-Commerce Directive.

A Belgian court had previously ruled that a local rights holder could force an ISP to filter content.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-15871961

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Expert Contributor 25th Nov, 2011 02:45
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November 24th, 2011, 19:23 GMT · By Eduard Kovacs
God's Blessing Wished for Malware Email Recipients

A scam email that targets Dutch and English speakers greet their victims with the popular “Gruss Gott,” a shortened variant of “Es grüße dich Gott" which means "May God bless you."

That's about the only thing that's Catholic about these emails since the rest of the message only tries to lure the recipients into opening links which point to a malicious worm that spreads like a plague and opens doors for other bad elements.

The email's subject doesn't say much about what's actually in stall for the unsuspecting victim, “Re: adviser id: 7356847”, ”Request id: 71066294”, “Bestel id 170-6513” and “Bestel N 841-5282” being just a few of the confusing messages that can be seen in inboxes.

“Gruss Gott, carmen. Your order has been accepted. Order id: 83435991. Terms of delivery and the date can be found with the auto-generated msword file located at: [LINK],” reads one of the messages provided by Mxlab.

“Gruss Gott, [email address] Thank you for the order. Id: 862446. Your credit card will be charged for 638 dollars. Information about the order and delivery located at: [LINK],” reads another variant.

Behind the innocent-looking link, a trojan identified by Microsoft as Worm:Win32/Gamarue.B silently awaits to be downloaded.

Once it lands on a device, it starts creating files, directories but also registry entries that make sure it can communicate with some shady IP addresses.

More at :-
http://news.softpedia.com/news/God-s-Blessing-Wish...

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Expert Contributor 25th Nov, 2011 18:29
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Unpatched Apache flaw allows access to internal network
Security researcher reveals how to bypass older patch for an Apache reverse proxy vulnerability

By Lucian Constantin
November 25, 2011 08:43 AM ET
IDG News Service - A yet-to-be-patched flaw discovered in the Apache HTTP server allows attackers to access protected resources on internal networks if some rewrite rules are not defined properly.

The vulnerability affects Apache installations that operate in reverse proxy mode, a type of configuration used for load balancing, caching and other operations that involve the distribution of resources over multiple servers.

In order to set up Apache HTTPD to run as a reverse proxy, server administrators use specialized modules like mod_proxy and mod_rewrite.

Security researchers from Qualys warn that if certain rules are not configured correctly, attackers can trick servers into performing unauthorized requests to access internal resources.

More at :-
http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9222160/Unp...

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Expert Contributor 25th Nov, 2011 18:41
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Cruel new punishment for hackers: Twitter, Facebook bans

UK's cyber-sentencing proposals revealed

By Anna Leach

Posted in Crime, 25th November 2011 13:43 GMT

Fraudsters and hackers could soon get slapped with social media bans as the government plans to encourage judges to dish out online punishments for online crime. The online tagging system is one of several recommendations announced today in the 2011 Cyber Security Strategy.

Intended to protect Britain and Britain's web business from the effects of cyber-crime, other plans in the report include getting spooks to warn UK consumers to update their anti-virus software on Facebook, and a focus on giving IT training to police.

Outlining the opportunities and also the dangers of the internet – particularly for UK online retail – the report advocates a programme of education and training to make everyone safer online. The government intends to leverage the cybersecurity knowledge it has in spy and intelligence central, GCHQ. It is not telling us about the other stuff it's doing as it's a secret.

More at :-
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2011/11/25/cyber_secu...

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Expert Contributor 25th Nov, 2011 18:47
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Apple took years to fix iTunes spyware vulnerability
By David Meyer, 25 November, 2011 11:08

Apple took more than three years to fix a hole in its iTunes updater that allowed the software to be used as a distribution vector for spyware.

A recent Wall Street Journal report detailed off-the-shelf surveillance software used by regimes such the one that fell in Egypt earlier this year. One of these packages was FinFisher, sold by a UK firm called Gamma. The spyware could be disseminated through a phony update for iTunes, exploiting a flaw in the media player's updating mechanism.

Cybercrime journalist Brian Krebs wrote on Wednesday that the same flaw had been reported to Apple by Argentinian security researcher Francisco Amato in July 2008. Amato had developed a penetration tool called Evilgrade to exploit the vulnerability.

According to email exchanges between Amato and Krebs, Apple acknowledged receipt of the researcher's report but did not contact him about the findings until October 2011,when it "sent an email to confirm his name and title for the purposes of crediting him with reporting the flaw in its iTunes 10.5.1 patch release details".

More at :-
http://www.zdnet.co.uk/blogs/communication-breakdo...

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Expert Contributor 25th Nov, 2011 18:53
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November 25th, 2011, 08:24 GMT · By Eduard Kovacs
How to Protect Yourself from 'Pharming' Websites

Unlike phishing scams where the victim is tricked into opening a link or a web form where he is required to provide financial or personal information, pharming schemes rely on webpages that almost perfectly replicate legitimate sites to which the user is taken without his knowledge.

In pharming operations, the cybercriminals actually set up redirects that make sure the URL typed by the internaut in the browser's address bar automatically changes and forwards to a malicious domain.

These malevolent redirects take place as a result of DNS poisoning or with the help of a carefully placed malware on the victim's device, SCAMwatch reports.

Whichever the case, there are certain methods that can protect users against such fake sites.

First of all, pharming scams will often require information such as credit card number, account number and even ATM PIN, data not requested by legitimate websites.

Genuine banking sites will only require a username and a password since they already have the customer's financial details. Claims about database errors as a result of which information was deleted usually hide some cybercriminal operation.

Secondly, even if the site looks exactly the same as the genuine one, the name of the site displayed in the browser's address bar can always give away its true identity. The domain might look legit, but a closer look will in most cases reveal that a few letters are not exactly in their place.

The digital certificate that validates a site is also a good way to tell if the location is phony or not. There are some situations where certificates are stolen and used in fraudulent plots, but in a majority of cases fake domains don't display the padlock icon or the https identification.

Since DNS poisonings are not that common, in most situations a local piece of malware is responsible for malicious redirects. This is why users are advised to install an antivirus solution and make sure its database is always up to date.

http://news.softpedia.com/news/How-to-Protect-Your...


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Expert Contributor 26th Nov, 2011 10:00
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Scareware slingers stumped by Google secure search
By John Leyden

Posted in Malware, 25th November 2011 15:16 GMT

Google made secure search the default option for logged in users last month – primarily for privacy protection reasons. But the move has had the beneficial side-effect of making life for difficult for fraudsters seeking to manipulate search engine rankings in order to promote scam sites, according to security researchers.

Users signed into Google were offered the ability to send search queries over secure (https) connections last month. This meant that search queries sent while using insecure networks, such as Wi-Fi hotspots, are no longer visible (and easily captured) by other users on the same network.

However Google also made a second (under-reported) change last month by omitting the search terms used to reach websites from the HTTP referrer header, where secure search is used. The approach means it has become harder for legitimate websites to see the search terms surfers fed through Google before reaching their website, making it harder for site to optimise or tune their content without using Google's analytics service.

But the change in the referrer header makes life proportionately much more difficult for black hat SEO operators, who commonly use link farms and other tactics in an attempt to manipulate search results so that links to scareware portals appear prominently in the search results for newsworthy searches. Surfers who stray onto these sites will be warned of non-existent security problems in a bid to coax them into paying for fake anti-virus software of little or no utility.

Read more at :-
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2011/11/25/google_sec...

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Expert Contributor 26th Nov, 2011 11:26
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November 26th, 2011, 08:55 GMT · By Eduard Kovacs
Birth, Death and Marriage Certificates Offered by Shady Sites

The authorities came across a large number of websites that apparently offer their services in helping individuals obtain birth, death, marriage or divorce certificates, but as it turns out, they request a number of fees for things that are available for free on government sites.

SCAMwatch released an advisory to help citizens in Australia and around the world learn how to deal with such phony websites.

In many situations, people need to obtain certain documents in the fastest time possible and that's the main thing these paper markets rely on the most. Since any kind of certificate is available only through official government registries, there's nothing they can actually do but intermediate these actions.

However, the fake websites set up for these services rely very much on images and symbols that try to replicate genuine government pages, which means that while their customers believe they're being helped, in fact, they end up paying for papers that they'll never actually see.

In an effort to seem as legitimate as possible, the so-called organizations will provide some documentation which they obtain for free, but in return they'll request fees or financial information that they may use to commit credit card fraud.

While some may provide payment methods they claim are secure, in most cases they turn out to actually be unencrypted and some will even subscribe you for ongoing payments.

Internet users are advised to document a service that offers birth, death, divorce or marriage certificates. Read online reviews since people who fell for a scam will in most cases report fraudulent activities.

Always use the links provided by official government websites and even if you're asked for a certificate fee, you'll never be required to pay for information.

Legitimate government sites never come with extensions such as .com or .org, so make sure the domain you're relying on to obtain the documents has the .gov extension.

Finally, when making payments, make sure that the connection the site is using is identified by the use of https or the padlock icon that usually represents a secure page.

http://news.softpedia.com/news/Birth-Death-and-Mar...

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Expert Contributor 28th Nov, 2011 10:25
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Not enough encrypted drives despite numerous data breaches
By John E Dunn

USB sticks remain a big security weakness for many UK organisations with many employees using drives for data transport without permission and not bothering to report their loss, a Ponemon Institute study has found.

The study polled 451 IT staff in the UK from a global total of 2,942 on behalf of Kingston Technology, finding that 73 percent had experienced staff use of USB drives without authorisation, with 72 percent mentioning loss without notification in the last two years.

Only half of UK organisations employed some form of security policy or technology to these devices, and awareness of the risk posed by them was to be low in Britain compared to security-aware countries such as Germany.

Organisations were reluctant to enforce the use of secure drives, with 55 percent of workers using generic drives bought by themselves or picked up at conferences or trade shows.

"If you lose a laptop you can't do your work; if you lose a USB stick nobody will ever know about it," said Larry Ponemon of the Ponemon Institute. "To many people a USB stick is just a ubiquitous device."

More at :-
http://www.pcadvisor.co.uk/news/security/3321169/u...

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Expert Contributor 28th Nov, 2011 15:18
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Last edited on 28th Nov, 2011 15:20
November 28th, 2011, 12:20 GMT · By Eduard Kovacs
BlackHole Kit Enhanced with New Java Exploit

Security researcher Brian Krebs stumbled upon a new exploit kit that relies on a recently patched security flaw present in Java, being packaged with the infamous BlackHole.

It seems as all the versions of Oracle’s Java are susceptible to the attack, except for the latest variants, but considering the fact that many don’t rush to update these components, the exploit could be used successfully against many devices.

Even more worryingly, these means of attack can be easily turned into automated tools, which once placed on a website, can infect the machines of unsuspecting Internet users without much effort.

“Java exploits are notoriously successful when bundled into commercial exploit packs, software kits that can turn a hacked Web site into a virtual minefield for Web users who aren’t keeping up to date with the latest security patches,” says Krebs.

Curiously, the Java exploit works on most browsers, except for Google Chrome, which for some reason in many cases mitigates attacks launched with the new package.

The security journalist also believes that, theoretically, such an attack can also work against Mac OS X operating systems, but so far it’s only been tested on Windows platforms.

More at :-
http://news.softpedia.com/news/BlackHole-Kit-Enhan...

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Expert Contributor 28th Nov, 2011 15:24
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Spooks take the wheel in UK's £650m cyber-war operations

GCHQ to lead info sharing with govt and biz
By John Leyden
Posted in Enterprise Security, 28th November 2011 12:17 GMT
Analysis The British government's Cyber Security Strategy is giving the intelligence agencies a greater role than ever in defending business and the public against internet threats.

The policy, released by the Cabinet Office on Friday, sketches a detailed framework on how the government aims to organise law enforcement efforts and improve the education of netizens on information security risks. At the same time the policy aims to support online businesses, estimated to account for six per cent of the UK economy.

Information security firms broadly back the policy even though some questioned the central role of GCHQ, the signals intelligence agency, and a depiction of the threat landscape that seems to paint cyberwar-style threats (think Stuxnet and cyber-espionage) as more a pressing concern than everyday cybercrime risks, at least if budget allocations are any guide.

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2011/11/28/cyber_secu...

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Expert Contributor 28th Nov, 2011 15:44
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Data watchdog warns of Maple Story threat
By Dave Neal
Mon Nov 28 2011, 11:40

THIRTEEN MILLION Korean gamers might be open to data abuse after hackers broke into gaming outfit Nexon and plucked their Maple Story credentials.
Reports from the South Korea say that the Korea Communications Commission (KCC) has warned about the threat to online gamers that was revealed to it late on Friday.
Nexon's Maple Story game has 13.2 million Korean subscribers and, according to the Korea Times, they risk exposure after their names, user identifications, resident registration numbers and passwords were leaked through the hacking incident.
The KCC ordered Nexon to inform its users and apparently it has. Unfortunately its web site is rather hard to navigate. The statement is not mirrored on the Nexon US web site, but this message, from Nexon CEO Seo Min via the Associated Press, apparently is it. He said, "We are taking all measures to prevent possible damages from the leakage and will come up with follow-up measures to ease your anxiety."
The Korean data watchdog will also carry out its own investigations, says the newspaper. "We have set up an investigation team, comprising of experts in private information and security, to get further details," a spokesperson for the KCC told the Korean Times.
The hacking attacked a backup server and took place on 18 November. The firm did not discover the break-in until late last week, however, but it appears to have reacted quickly. µ


http://www.theinquirer.net/inquirer/news/2128069/m...

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Expert Contributor 29th Nov, 2011 20:02
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Open Source FFmpeg Project Gets Security Updates

Versions 0.7.8 and 0.8.7 patch several vulnerabilities.

November 28, 2011 Share
Version 0.7.8 and 0.8.7 of the open source FFmpeg solution were recently released.

"The updates correct issues that could be exploited by an attacker to cause a denial-of-service (DoS) condition or potentially compromise an application that uses FFmpeg -- well known open source software that uses the library collection includes the VLC Media Player, MPlayer and Perian," The H Security reports.

"The vulnerabilities addressed in the update include errors in the QDM2 decoder and 'vp3_dequant()' function that could be used to trigger a buffer overflow, as well as a problem in a number of functions that could lead to out-of-bounds reads," the article states.

Go to "FFmpeg updates fix security bugs" to read the details

http://www.esecurityplanet.com/open-source-securit...

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Expert Contributor 29th Nov, 2011 20:10
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Cyber crime on the rise in the UK

Cyber crime contributes to rising UK fraud levels, according to consultancy’s latest global research.
By Miya Knights, 29 Nov 2011 at 09:51

Cyber crime has become a major contributor to rising fraud levels in the UK, according to the results of a global economic crime survey published today.

Nearly a quarter of UK respondents to the PricewaterhouseCoopers study said they had experienced more than 10 incidents of economic crime during the year. While over half (51 per cent) reported at least one instance of economic crime in the last 12 months, compared with the global figure of 34 per cent.

This is a dramatic finding and marks the promotion of cyber crime to the premier league of fraud.
Cyber crime was the third most common type of economic crime in the UK, where levels of ‘conventional’ economic crime, like asset misappropriation and accounting fraud fell compared with PwC’s last survey in 2009.

Tony Parton, PwC forensics partner, said the fact that 26 per cent of those who experienced
an economic crime in the last 12 months reported a cyber crime was particularly alarming.

Read more at :-
http://www.itpro.co.uk/637585/cyber-crime-on-the-r...

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Expert Contributor 29th Nov, 2011 20:16
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HP Printers May Be Remotely Set On Fire, Researchers Say

Columbia University researchers Ang Cui and Salvatore Stolfo found a vulnerability in HP LaserJet printers that could allow a hacker to remotely control it to launch cyberattacks, steal information that’s being printed and even instruct its mechanical components to overload until the device catches on fire.

According to MSNBC, Cui and Stolfo revealed that the flaw they found does not affect only HP printers, but also other devices utilized by millions of individuals and companies that so far were considered to be safe.

In one of the cases of the HP printers which they thoroughly tested, the researchers relied on the fact that remote software updates are not checked for signatures or certificates when they’re being installed, but this wasn’t the only issue.

In another demonstration, by sending the device a specially crafted print job, they were able to inject a code that would automatically scan printed documents for sensitive information, transmitting the sensitive data to a Twitter feed.

They showed that an infected computer could instruct the printer’s fuser, the one used to dry off the paper, to continuously heat up until the device self-destructs or, if it lacks a fuse, to set itself on fire.

Even more worryingly, during the tests they also proved that a hijacked printer could act as a gate-opener for a full-effect attack on a company network. They even made a demo from computers running Mac and Linux operating systems.

“Printers have been a weak spot for many corporate networks. Many people don’t realize that a printer is just another computer on a network with exactly the same problems and, if compromised, the same impact,” said F-Secure’s Mikko Hypponen.

HP representatives argue that the situation might not be all that disastrous, claiming that their newer models do check for signature while performing firmware updates. However, they’re currently investigating the issue to determine exactly who is affected and what can be done about it.

Even though later printer models should be more secure, the researchers claim that one of the printers used in their tests was purchased not long ago.

http://news.softpedia.com/news/HP-Printers-May-Be-...

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Expert Contributor 29th Nov, 2011 20:47
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Ministry of Defence cyber chief urges UK to follow Estonian example The UK needs to follow Estonia's example in order to improve user education and reduce the vast majority of cyber threats, giving government and industry an easier target for harm reduction, according to the head of the Ministry of Defence's Defence Cyber Operations Group.
Major General Jonathan Shaw argued at the Cyber Security 2011 conference on Tuesday that ''cyber war' is a misleading term.
"I dislike the words 'war' and 'cyber' because both imply it's something specialised and technical; other people's problems. This is absolutely wrong," he said.
"My observation is that activity in cyber space breaks down and crosses all barriers [and] distinctions between war and peace and civilians and personnel. We are all under attack all the time."
Shaw explained that the UK needs to move from a country in "pre-attack mode" to emulate Estonia, which is "an interesting example of a country in post-attack mode".
He likened the time lag that exists in the UK between the population appreciating there is a risk in cyber space and doing something about it, to a similar lag in the 1980s when the risks of contracting Aids were clearly publicised but large numbers still practised unsafe sex.

More at :-
http://www.v3.co.uk/v3-uk/news/2128527/ministry-de...

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Expert Contributor 30th Nov, 2011 09:09
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BUSTED! Secret app on millions of phones logs key taps

Researcher says seeing is believing

By Dan Goodin in San Francisco

Posted in Security, 30th November 2011 02:34 GMT

An Android app developer has published what he says is conclusive proof that millions of smartphones are secretly monitoring the key presses, geographic locations, and received messages of its users.

In a YouTube video posted on Monday, Trevor Eckhart showed how software from a Silicon Valley company known as Carrier IQ recorded in real time the keys he pressed into a stock EVO handset, which he had reset to factory settings just prior to the demonstration. Using a packet sniffer while his device was in airplane mode, he demonstrated how each numeric tap and every received text message is logged by the software.

Ironically, he says, the Carrier IQ software recorded the “hello world” dispatch even before it was displayed on his handset.

Eckhart then connected the device to a Wi-Fi network and pointed his browser at Google. Even though he denied the search giant's request that he share his physical location, the Carrier IQ software recorded it. The secret app then recorded the precise input of his search query – again, “hello world” – even though he typed it into a page that uses the SSL, or secure sockets layer, protocol to encrypt data sent between the device and the servers.

“We can see that Carrier IQ is querying these strings over my wireless network [with] no 3G connectivity and it is reading HTTPS,” the 25-year-old Eckhart says.

Read more at :-
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2011/11/30/smartphone...

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Expert Contributor 30th Nov, 2011 09:14
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Google researchers propose fix for ailing SSL system

Changes would overhaul net's foundation of trust

By Dan Goodin in San Francisco

Posted in Enterprise Security, 29th November 2011 21:57 GMT

Security researchers from Google have proposed an overhaul to improve the security of the Secure Sockets Layer encryption protocol that millions of websites use to protect communications against eavesdropping and counterfeiting.

The changes are designed to fix a structural flaw that allows any one of the more than 600 bodies authorized to issue valid digital certificates to generate a website credential without the permission of the underlying domain name holder. The dire consequences of fraudulently issued certificates was underscored in late August when hackers pierced the defenses of Netherlands-based DigiNotar and minted bogus certificates for Google and other high-profile websites. One of the fraudulent credentials, for Google mail, was used to snoop on as many as 300,000 users, most of them from Iran.

Under changes proposed on Tuesday by Google security researchers Ben Laurie and Adam Langley (PDF here), all certificate authorities would be required to publish the cryptographic details of every website certificate to a publicly accessible log that's been cryptographically signed to guarantee its accuracy. The overhaul, they said, is designed to make it impossible – or at least much more difficult – for certificates to be issued without the knowledge of the domain name holder.

Read more at :-
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2011/11/29/google_pro...

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Expert Contributor 30th Nov, 2011 09:18
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Hackers launch millions of Java exploits, says Microsoft
Cryin' shame: 60% of Windows PCs lack 18-month-old Java update, adds expert

By Gregg Keizer
November 29, 2011 02:41 PM ET
Computerworld - Hackers continue to launch attacks exploiting vulnerabilities in Oracle's Java software in record numbers, Microsoft said Monday.

Citing research from a recent report, Tim Rains, a director in the company's Trustworthy Computing group, said that up to half of all attacks detected and blocked by Microsoft's security software over a 12-month period were Java exploits.

Altogether, Microsoft stopped more than 27 million Java exploits from mid-2010 through mid-2011.

Most of those exploits targeted long-ago-patched vulnerabilities, said Rains.

The most commonly-blocked Java attacks -- to the tune of over 2.5 million of them -- in the first half of 2011 exploited a bug disclosed in March 2010 and patched by Oracle the same month. Second on the popularity chart for the full 12-month stretch was an exploit of a bug patched in early December 2008, nearly three years ago.

Read more at :-
http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9222244/Hac...

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Microsoft outs cross domain sharing in Internet Explorer 10 preview

Makes it easier for users to share files
By Lawrence Latif
Wed Nov 30 2011, 14:00
SOFTWARE REDEVELOPER Microsoft has released an updated Internet Explorer 10 (IE10) preview supporting what it calls cross origin resource sharing (CORS).
Microsoft's IE10 is set to be released with the firm's upcoming Windows 8 operating system and the company has been banging on about the browser's support for and performance of HTML5. In the latest IE10 preview, the firm has shown off CORS, allowing users to share data from multiple applications through HTML and XML.
Microsoft also revealed CSS user-select, Javascript typed arrays and File API Writer support. The firm was also keen to show that IE10's rendering outperformed that of Google's Chrome web browser. However, unlike Chrome or Mozilla's Firefox, the IE10 preview is only available on Windows 8.

More at :-
http://www.theinquirer.net/inquirer/news/2128993/m...

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Expert Contributor 30th Nov, 2011 19:00
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Judge orders Google, Facebook to remove fake sites

A US Judge has ordered Google, Yahoo, Twitter and Facebook, among others, to delist domain names linked to websites selling counterfeit goods.

It represents a significant step in the ongoing battle against the sale of fake items online.

The case was brought by luxury goods maker Chanel against 600 sites which it had identified as trading in counterfeits.

Many experts were surprised at the scope of the Nevada judge's ruling.

US firm GoDaddy, which manages around 45 million domain names, has been given control of the web addresses of the 600 firms. It has been told to ensure that none of the sites can be accessed.
More at :-
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-15959882

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Last edited on 1st Dec, 2011 19:44
November 30th, 2011, 13:44 GMT · By Eduard Kovacs
Google, AOL, Yahoo and Microsoft Partner with Agari to Reduce Phishing

Four major players of the Internet, Microsoft, Google, Yahoo and AOL, unite their forces with Agari, a company that hopes to revolutionize email security, with the purpose of developing new ways to keep email inboxes clean.

According to CNET, Agari analyzes 1.5 billion emails each day in the attempt of trying to find patterns that could allow for the development of sophisticated mechanisms that can detect and counterattack phishing campaigns.

Facebook and other social media websites can access the analysis to see when phishing attacks occur and based on the data, they can create authentication policies with the email provider to make sure it stops the delivery of the malicious messages.

“Facebook can go into the Agari console and see charts and graphs of all the activity going on in their e-mail channel (on their domains and third-party solutions) and see when an attack is going on in a bar chart of spam hitting Yahoo,” says Daniel Raskin, vice president of marketing for Agari.

“They receive a real-time alert and they can construct a policy to push out to carriers (that says) when you see this thing happening don't deliver it, reject it.”

The fact that the company sweeps through all those emails may raise some privacy concerns, but Raskin claims that they are only provided with the links contained in them, not the actual content. They send these links to the organization whose name is being used in the phishing so they can take immediate action.

http://news.softpedia.com/news/Google-AOL-Yahoo-an...

Google already implemented anti-phishing and anti-fraud policies for Gmail users since 2004, but with the help of Agari, they can take it to another level.

"Proper coordination between senders and receivers is the best way to cut down on the transmission of unauthorized mail, and AGARI's approach helps simplify this process," said Google Product Manager Adam Dawes.


This thread is now closed......please see the December Edition at :-
http://secunia.com/community/forum/thread/show/118... Thankyou.


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