Secunia CSI7
Advisories
Research
Forums
Create Profile
Our Commitment
PSI
PSI API
CSI
OSI
xSI
Vulnerabilities
Programs
Open Discussions
My Threads
Create Thread
Statistics
About

Forum Thread: "Microsoft" malicious calls / Season's Greetings

You are currently viewing a forum thread in the Secunia Community Forum. Please note that opinions expressed here are not of Secunia but solely reflect those of the user who wrote it.

This thread was submitted in the following forum:
Open Discussions

This thread has been marked as locked.
taffy078 "Microsoft" malicious calls / Season's Greetings
Contributor 17th Dec, 2011 09:55
Ranking: 408
Posts: 1,321
User Since: 26th Feb, 2009
System Score: 100%
Location: UK
Well - it's only 08:43 here and already I've had lots of excitement!

I had a call just now from a friendly man called 'Gordon'. He works for Microsoft - he said; he warned me about a terrible threat to my Windows operating system from nasties trying to access it by exploiting vulnerabilities. He was not Engish and he had terrible trouble pronouncing 'vulnerabilities'. To be honest, he had terrible trouble reading his script.

But he was a nice man - all I had to do was to sit at my PC and follow his instructions.

I struggled to contain my excitement! Maurice Joyce had already warned us about this threat so how should I tell 'Gordon' thanks but no thanks. Sadly I failed. I asked him if he was one of the nasties trying to break into my PC. His script didn't allow him to deal with my questions. I may then have been rather 'stern' and I suggested what he could do next.

When he rang back a few minutes later, I discovered that I was speaking in a strange accent. That confused him even more and he rang off! I imagine he or his colleagues, or his employers' computerised phone system will continue to ring me throughout the day. I lead such an exciting life!

The purpose of this story? To thank Maurice for his timely warning and to let others know that we still need to be on our guard.

In closing, thank you to all those who continue to help PC users in distress. May I also wish everyone - forum members and Secunia staff - all the very best for the coming celebrations.

May you all enjoy a happy and healthy 2012.

--
taffy078, West Yorkshire, UK

Desktop: Compaq Presario (OEM) 32 bit / AMD Athlon / 2 GB RAM
XP Home - SP3/ IE8/ Norton IS - Secunia PSI v2.0.0.3003

Laptop: Win 7 / IE11 / PSI v2.0.0.3003

Maurice Joyce RE: "Microsoft" malicious calls / Season's Greetings
Handling Contributor 17th Dec, 2011 10:25
Score: 11616
Posts: 8,908
User Since: 4th Jan 2009
System Score: N/A
Location: UK
For those reading the above post I have not published anything elsewhere on this Forum because I am unsure whether it is a Global issue or just UK residents.

If U are a UK resident U may wish to know this addition detail:

The Warning Signs.

1. The caller display on your telephone will show the number is withheld.
2. The caller claims to be a Microsoft employee.
3. The caller will give details of your name address etc. - means nothing as they can trawl that basic detail from anywhere so do not be fooled by that ploy.

The Facts.
1. After some research I found the incoming number is 08081890441.
2. The caller could be a female called Soni(y) - sounded Indian to me.
3. Further research revealed Microsoft is not the legal "owner" of this number. To locate the exact owner a fee of £3 is required - I am not interested so declined.
4. As a matter of policy Microsoft DO NOT cold call anyone.
5. I rang the 0808 number back - this time it was a male who tried his luck. Once I started asking more details he became very angry & slammed the phone down.
6. I have reported the incident to Microsoft.

Clearly this remains an issue - I have personally helped 5 local people who asked for assistance.

The only Gordon I know is an train engine from the series "Thomas The Tank Engine"!

--
Maurice

Windows 7 SP1 64 Bit OS
HP Intel Pentium i7
IE 11 for Windows 7 SP1
16GB RAM
Was this reply relevant?
+3
-0
taffy078 RE: "Microsoft" malicious calls / Season's Greetings
Contributor 17th Dec, 2011 11:25
Score: 408
Posts: 1,321
User Since: 26th Feb 2009
System Score: 100%
Location: UK
thanks for that, Maurice.

It's a global issue, according to this: http://www.electronista.com/articles/11/06/16/fift...

I thought these were interesting:

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2010/jul/18/phone-...

http://mtaulty.com/CommunityServer/blogs/mike_taul...

A search on "fake phone calls from Microsoft" returns loads of such articles. It's hard to believe that telephone providers can't stop this at source. Perhaps they too must be making too much money from this.

--
taffy078, West Yorkshire, UK

Desktop: Compaq Presario (OEM) 32 bit / AMD Athlon / 2 GB RAM
XP Home - SP3/ IE8/ Norton IS - Secunia PSI v2.0.0.3003

Laptop: Win 7 / IE11 / PSI v2.0.0.3003
Was this reply relevant?
+13
-0
Maurice Joyce RE: "Microsoft" malicious calls / Season's Greetings
Handling Contributor 17th Dec, 2011 11:44
Score: 11616
Posts: 8,908
User Since: 4th Jan 2009
System Score: N/A
Location: UK
Good articles which should "sum it up" for everyone.

--
Maurice

Windows 7 SP1 64 Bit OS
HP Intel Pentium i7
IE 11 for Windows 7 SP1
16GB RAM
Was this reply relevant?
+0
-0
ddmarshall RE: "Microsoft" malicious calls / Season's Greetings
Dedicated Contributor 17th Dec, 2011 15:30
Score: 1205
Posts: 956
User Since: 8th Nov 2008
System Score: 98%
Location: UK
This is prevalent in English speaking countries. I first had one of these several years ago. Interestingly, it was shortly after I contacted a company with a call centre in India. They use other names besides Microsoft.

If you continue with them, a common way they will proceed is to get you to open Event Viewer. They will then tell you that the various errors and warnings which everyone has are evidence of a malware infection. Another tactic is to get you to type 'Prefetch Junk Files' in the 'Start Search' box. This lists the Prefetch folder. ( The junk files bit is just flimflam - you get the same if you put anything or nothing there). Again they will then tell you it's evidence of a virus.
Once they have got you convinced you have a problem, they get you to use a legitimate remote access tool like Logemein, Teamviewer or Ammy to let them repair you computer. If you are lucky, they will charge you £149 to run Malwarebytes. If you are not, there's no knowing what they get up to.

Here the Microsoft warning:
http://www.microsoft.com/en-gb/security/online-pri...

And some more articles:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-15690898
http://isc.sans.edu/diary/Microsoft+Support+Scam+a...
http://blogs.technet.com/b/trustworthycomputing/ar...
http://www.guardian.co.uk/technology/2011/sep/22/m...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FJajKg8rk0o&feature...

--
This answer is provided “as-is.” You bear the risk of using it.
Was this reply relevant?
+4
-0

This thread has been marked as locked.


 Products Solutions Customers Partner Resources Company
 
 Corporate
Vulnerability Intelligence Manager (VIM)
Corporate Software Inspector (CSI)
Consumer
Personal Software Inspector (PSI)
Online Software Inspector (OSI)
 Industry
Compliance
Technology
Integration
 Customers
Testimonials
 VARS
MSSP
Technology Partners
References
 Reports
Webinars
Events
 About us
Careers
Memberships
Newsroom


 
© 2002-2014 Secunia ApS - Rued Langgaards Vej 8, 4th floor, DK-2300 Copenhagen, Denmark - +45 7020 5144
Terms & Conditions and Copyright - Privacy - Report Vulnerability