Forum Thread: Browser News

You are currently viewing a forum thread in the Secunia Community Forum. Please note that opinions expressed here are not of Secunia but solely reflect those of the user who wrote it.

This thread was submitted in the following forum:
Open Discussions

This thread has been marked as locked.
mogs Browser News
Member 31st Oct, 2013 17:47
Ranking:
Posts: 6,279
User Since: 22nd Apr, 2009
System Score: N/A
Location: UK


--

mogs RE: Browser News
Member 1st Nov, 2013 15:34
Score:
Posts: 6,279
User Since: 22nd Apr 2009
System Score: N/A
Location: UK
Last edited on 1st Nov, 2013 15:48


--
Was this reply relevant?
+0
-0
mogs RE: Browser News
Member 1st Nov, 2013 16:08
Score:
Posts: 6,279
User Since: 22nd Apr 2009
System Score: N/A
Location: UK
Last edited on 1st Nov, 2013 16:19


--
Was this reply relevant?
+0
-0
mogs RE: Browser News
Member 1st Nov, 2013 21:35
Score:
Posts: 6,279
User Since: 22nd Apr 2009
System Score: N/A
Location: UK


--
Was this reply relevant?
+0
-0
mogs RE: Browser News
Member 2nd Nov, 2013 11:21
Score:
Posts: 6,279
User Since: 22nd Apr 2009
System Score: N/A
Location: UK


--
Was this reply relevant?
+0
-0
mogs RE: Browser News
Member 2nd Nov, 2013 11:26
Score:
Posts: 6,279
User Since: 22nd Apr 2009
System Score: N/A
Location: UK


--
Was this reply relevant?
+0
-0
mogs RE: Browser News
Member 2nd Nov, 2013 17:55
Score:
Posts: 6,279
User Since: 22nd Apr 2009
System Score: N/A
Location: UK
More about :-
'Canary' Chrome chirps when it smells malware
Google expands on work since 2011 to keep attack code off personal computers

By Gregg Keizer
November 2, 2013 09:17 AM ET

Computerworld - Google on Thursday expanded malware blocking in an early development build of Chrome to sniff out a wider range of threats than the browser already recognizes.

Chrome's current "Canary" build -- the label for very-early versions of the browser, earlier than even Chrome's Dev channel -- will post a warning at the bottom of the window when it detects an attempted download of malicious code.

Features added to the Canary build usually, although not always, eventually make it into the Dev channel -- the roughest-edged of the three distributed to users -- and from there into the Beta and Stable channels. Google did not spell out a timetable for the expanded malware blocking.

Chrome has included malware blocking for more than two years, since version 12 launched in June 2011, and the functionality was extended in February 2012 with Chrome 17.

Chrome is now at version 30.

Canary's blocking, however, is more aggressive on two fronts: It is more assertive in its alerts and detects more malware forms, including threats that pose as legitimate software and monkey with the browser's settings.

"Content.exe is malicious, and Chrome has blocked it," the message in Canary reads. The sole visible option is to click the "Dismiss" button, which makes the warning vanish. The only additional option, and that only after another click, is to "Learn more," which leads to yet another warning.

Canary warning
The Canary very-early build of Chrome displays this warning if it suspects a to-be-downloaded file is dangerous.
In Canary, there is no way for the user to contradict the malware blocking.

That's different than in the current Stable build of Chrome, which relies on a message that says, "This file is malicious. Are you sure you want to continue?" and gives the user a choice between tossing the downloaded file or saving it anyway.

As it has for some time, Chrome will show such warnings on select file extensions, primarily ".exe," which in Windows denotes an executable file, and ".msi," an installation package for Windows applications. Canary's expansion, said Google, also warns when the user tries to download some less obvious threats, including payloads masquerading as legitimate software -- it cited screen savers and video plug-ins in a Thursday blog -- that hijack browser settings to silently change the home page or insert ads into websites to monetize the malware.

Browser hijacking is old-school malware -- it's been around for years and was one of the first ways attackers funded their work -- associated with rogue toolbars and "adware," a malware label that's fallen out of favor.

In the Thursday blog, Linus Upson, a Google vice president of engineering, claimed that browser hijacking remained one of the most popular complaints by Chrome users on its support forums. Previously, Google also added a "Reset browser settings" option in the browser's settings panel so users can restore Chrome to its original state after a hijack.

Google's malware blocking is part of its Safe Browsing API (application programming interface) and service, which Chrome, Apple's Safari and Mozilla's Firefox all access to warn customers of potentially dangerous websites before they reach them.

In Chrome's case, the malware warning stems not only from the Safe Browsing "blacklist" of dodgy websites, but according to NSS Labs, a security software testing company, also from the Content Agnostic Malware Protection (CAMP) technology that Google has baked into its implementation of Safe Browsing.

CAMP is a reputational technology, similar to Microsoft's SmartScreen Application Reputation (App Rep), which was first added to Internet Explorer in version 9 (IE9) in March 2011. Both CAMP and App Rep use a combination of whitelists, blacklists and algorithms to create a ranking of the probability that a download is legitimate software. Files that don't meet a set legitimacy bar trigger a warning.

Since Google started using CAMP, NSS Labs said in a report issued last week (download PDF), Chrome's ability to spot and block malware has increased dramatically: From a 70% blocking rate in 2012 to 83% in 2013.

Users can try out the Canary build of Chrome by downloading it from Google's website.

http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9243768/_Ca...

Chrome Release Channels
http://www.chromium.org/getting-involved/dev-chann...

--
Was this reply relevant?
+0
-0
mogs RE: Browser News
Member 6th Nov, 2013 11:11
Score:
Posts: 6,279
User Since: 22nd Apr 2009
System Score: N/A
Location: UK
Last edited on 6th Nov, 2013 11:24


--
Was this reply relevant?
+0
-0
mogs RE: Browser News
Member 6th Nov, 2013 11:45
Score:
Posts: 6,279
User Since: 22nd Apr 2009
System Score: N/A
Location: UK


--
Was this reply relevant?
+0
-0
mogs RE: Browser News
Member 7th Nov, 2013 14:01
Score:
Posts: 6,279
User Since: 22nd Apr 2009
System Score: N/A
Location: UK


--
Was this reply relevant?
+0
-0
mogs RE: Browser News
Member 7th Nov, 2013 18:51
Score:
Posts: 6,279
User Since: 22nd Apr 2009
System Score: N/A
Location: UK


--
Was this reply relevant?
+0
-0
mogs RE: Browser News
Member 8th Nov, 2013 17:51
Score:
Posts: 6,279
User Since: 22nd Apr 2009
System Score: N/A
Location: UK


--
Was this reply relevant?
+0
-0
mogs RE: Browser News
Member 11th Nov, 2013 22:10
Score:
Posts: 6,279
User Since: 22nd Apr 2009
System Score: N/A
Location: UK


--
Was this reply relevant?
+0
-0
mogs RE: Browser News
Member 12th Nov, 2013 17:56
Score:
Posts: 6,279
User Since: 22nd Apr 2009
System Score: N/A
Location: UK


--
Was this reply relevant?
+0
-0
mogs RE: Browser News
Member 13th Nov, 2013 15:25
Score:
Posts: 6,279
User Since: 22nd Apr 2009
System Score: N/A
Location: UK


--
Was this reply relevant?
+0
-0
mogs RE: Browser News
Member 14th Nov, 2013 16:03
Score:
Posts: 6,279
User Since: 22nd Apr 2009
System Score: N/A
Location: UK
Researchers hack Internet Explorer 11 and Chrome at Mobile Pwn2Own
Previously unknown vulnerabilities in the two browsers were exploited to fully compromise Windows 8.1 and Android mobile devices

By Lucian Constantin | 14 November 13

Security researchers have compromised Microsoft Surface RT, Nexus 4 and Samsung Galaxy S4 devices by exploiting previously unknown vulnerabilities in Internet Explorer 11 running on Windows 8.1 and Google Chrome running on Android.
The exploits were demonstrated during the Mobile Pwn2Own hacking contest that ran Wednesday and Thursday at the PacSec Applied Security Conference in Tokyo.
Researchers Abdul Aziz Hariri and Matt Molinyawe from Hewlett-Packard's Zero Day Initiative (ZDI) team, which organized the contest, demonstrated an Internet Explorer 11 exploit on a Microsoft Surface RT device running Windows 8.1.
"Exploiting a bug in IE is difficult in general because of the protections and security controls they've implemented," Hariri said. The vulnerability was exploited twice in order to leak a memory address and then gain remote code execution, "which gave us full control over the whole machine," he said.
The vulnerability was reported to Microsoft so the company can protect users, Molinyawe said.
Another researcher who uses the pseudonym Pinkie Pie compromised Nexus 4 and Samsung Galaxy S4 devices by exploiting a vulnerability in Chrome.
Achieving remote code execution through a Chrome vulnerability is considered very difficult because of the application sandbox that separates the browser's processes from the operating system.
There have been only a handful of Chrome sandbox escape exploits demonstrated over the years and most of them were presented by researchers at hacking contests. Pinkie Pie hacked Chrome's sandbox two times before in 2012 as part of Google's Pwnium contests.


Read more: http://www.pcadvisor.co.uk/news/mobile-phone/34891...

--
Was this reply relevant?
+0
-0
mogs RE: Browser News
Member 14th Nov, 2013 23:02
Score:
Posts: 6,279
User Since: 22nd Apr 2009
System Score: N/A
Location: UK
Chrome Stable gets another update !


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 2013

Stable Channel Update
Chrome has been updated to 31.0.1650.57 for Windows, Mac, Linux and Chrome Frame.

Security fixes and rewards:


Congratulations to Pinkie Pie, for reclaiming his title with another impressive exploit!


[Ka-po-po-po-pow!!! $50,000] [319117] [319477] Critical CVE-2013-6632: Multiple memory corruption issues. Credit to Pinkie Pie.

Please see the Chromium security page for more detail. Note that the referenced bugs may be kept private until a majority of our users are up to date with the fix.

A full list of changes is available in the SVN log. Interested in switching release channels? Find out how. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug.

Anthony Laforge
Google Chrome

http://googlechromereleases.blogspot.co.uk/

--
Was this reply relevant?
+0
-0
mogs RE: Browser News
Member 15th Nov, 2013 12:27
Score:
Posts: 6,279
User Since: 22nd Apr 2009
System Score: N/A
Location: UK
Microsoft: One of the Patch Tuesday vulnerabilities not actually patched
Summary: One of the Internet Explorer vulnerabilities supposedly fixed in Tuesday's cumulative update was not in fact fixed.

Larry Seltzer
By Larry Seltzer for Zero Day | November 14, 2013 -- 22:01 GMT

Microsoft today issued an update to one of this week's Patch Tuesday bulletins to note that one of the vulnerabilities listed in it as being fixed was not, in fact, fixed.

The bulletin was MS13-080: Cumulative Security Update for Internet Explorer. It originally disclosed 10 vulnerabilities. One of them, CVE-2013-3871, is an "Internet Explorer Memory Corruption Vulnerability." The vulnerability was credited to Simon Zuckerbraun working with HP's Zero Day Initiative.

Symantec has a little more explanation in their description of the bug:

Microsoft Internet Explorer is prone to a memory-corruption vulnerability. Attackers can exploit this issue to execute arbitrary code in the context of the currently logged-in user. Failed attacks will cause denial-of-service conditions. Microsoft Internet Explorer 6, 7, 8, 9, and 10 are affected.
Microsoft says that including CVE-2013-3871 in the bulletin was a documentation error. It is scheduled to be addressed in a future security update, the date of which was not specified.

http://www.zdnet.com/microsoft-one-of-the-patch-tu...

--
Was this reply relevant?
+0
-0
mogs RE: Browser News
Member 20th Nov, 2013 22:37
Score:
Posts: 6,279
User Since: 22nd Apr 2009
System Score: N/A
Location: UK


--
Was this reply relevant?
+0
-0
mogs RE: Browser News
Member 20th Nov, 2013 22:55
Score:
Posts: 6,279
User Since: 22nd Apr 2009
System Score: N/A
Location: UK


--
Was this reply relevant?
+0
-0
mogs RE: Browser News
Member 21st Nov, 2013 08:56
Score:
Posts: 6,279
User Since: 22nd Apr 2009
System Score: N/A
Location: UK


--
Was this reply relevant?
+0
-0
mogs RE: Browser News
Member 22nd Nov, 2013 13:51
Score:
Posts: 6,279
User Since: 22nd Apr 2009
System Score: N/A
Location: UK
Browser extension creates 'disposable' data for privacy
Abine's DoNotTrackMe extension is designed to prevent collection of a user's personal data

By Jeremy Kirk | 22 November 13
A Boston-based company, Abine, is beefing its anti-tracking browser extension to let users shield their real credit card details, email addresses and phone numbers during web transactions.

The new features are being added to "DoNotTrackMe," an extension for Firefox, Internet Explorer, Chrome, and Safari that blocks tracking technologies used by advertising and social networks and data collectors.

The latest capabilities, which were already in Abine's MaskMe password management tool, allow users to give out a one-time use credit card number to e-commerce vendors, along with a disposable email address and phone number.

Data collection is a brisk business these days. Companies sell personal data, share it with ad networks and business partners or transfer it to new companies if they're acquired, said Rob Shavell, Abine's co-founder.

Read more: http://www.pcadvisor.co.uk/news/security/3490576/b...

--
Was this reply relevant?
+0
-0
mogs RE: Browser News
Member 22nd Nov, 2013 21:17
Score:
Posts: 6,279
User Since: 22nd Apr 2009
System Score: N/A
Location: UK


--
Was this reply relevant?
+0
-0
mogs RE: Browser News
Member 23rd Nov, 2013 13:10
Score:
Posts: 6,279
User Since: 22nd Apr 2009
System Score: N/A
Location: UK


--
Was this reply relevant?
+0
-0

This thread has been marked as locked.